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Fig and Grape Couscous Pudding

Categories: Blood Vacuity, Desserts, Kidney Yin Vacuity, Vegan, Vegetarian

Figs

Fig and Grape Couscous Pudding

Ingredients:
2 figs
2 cups of red grapes
½ cup of raisins or goji berries
1 cup of couscous
2 tbsp raw honey
1 tsp sea salt
1 ½ cups water.

Preparation:
Blend figs and grapes together until they form a thick soup. Bring water
to a boil and add couscous and blended fruits. Reduce heat to low and
boil for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in raw honey, sea salt, and
raisins/goji berries. Cover and let sit for five minutes, then spoon out
onto a plate and mold as desired (pudding will begin to cool and thicken
to a pasty consistency).

Makes 3-6 servings.

by Greg Bell

This recipe may be used to nourish Kidney yin and, to some extent, jing.

Figs: sweet, neutral, SP, LU, LI. Reinforces the SP/ST, moistens the LU
and throat, moistens the Intestines and promotes bowel movements. From the
vantage point of systematic correspondence, figs could be said to benefit
the male reproductive system, particularly in cases of impotence from low
sperm count. They grow in pairs, closely resemble the testicles, and
contain many small seeds.

Grapes/raisins: sweet, sl. sour, neutral. KD, LV, ST. Reinforces the LV
and KD, replenishes qi and blood, promotes production of body fluids,
promotes urination.

Raw honey: It is important to use raw honey that has not been filtered
because it will then retain active enzymes and bee pollen which benefit
the middle jiao and nourish KD jing.

Couscous: Couldn’t find any info on the energetic properties of this
grain. Seeing as how it’s in the wheat family, I would judge its
properties to be sweet and neutral – warm, entering the SP, ST, and KD.

gluten-free recipes

Categories: Gluten-free

For anyone with a gluten sensitivity, the following link should give you access to a series of videos with gluten-free recipes. Sorry the link is so long, but it’s the only way to access the videos. You’ll be asked to sign up with a name and email address. the recipes were developed by Tiffany Pollard MS, LAc, LMP who studied under Lonny Jarrett and Paul Pitchford. I was able to do a phone interview with her, and she’s very nice and generous with information. Enjoy.

http://us1.forward-to-friend.com/forward/show?u=886c531b241c53cc4d45c9898&id=2b725a1a4a

Eat Grain Sprouts for Better Health

Categories: Articles

Sprouted grains are good for you too! Sprouting is easy and economical, and Spring would seem an appropriate time to eat sprouts. Have a look.

http://www.farmradio.org/english/radio-scripts/31-4script_en.asp

The Nutrition Source: Health Gains from Whole Grains

Categories: Articles, Food Education

The Nutrition Source
Health Gains from Whole Grains

Examples of Whole Grains (examples2Dwhole2Dgrains.jpg)

* Whole wheat berries, whole wheat bulgur, whole wheat couscous and other strains of wheat such as kamut and spelt
* Brown rice (including quick-cooking brown rice)
* Corn, whole cornmeal, popcorn
* Oat groats, steel-cut oats, rolled oats (including quick cooking and instant oatmeal)
* Whole rye
* Hulled barley (pot, scotch, and pearled barley often have much of their bran removed)
* Triticale (pronounced tri-ti-kay-lee)
* Millet
* Teff (reported to be the world’s smallest grain and to have a sweet, malt-like flavor)
* Buckwheat, quinoa (pronounced keen-wah), wild rice, and amaranth are considered whole grains even though botanically they are not in the grain family of plants

For millennia, the grains humans ate came straight from the stalk. That means they got a carbohydrate package rich in fiber, healthy fats, vitamins, minerals, plant enzymes, hormones, and hundreds of other phytochemicals. Even after we learned how to grind grain, we still got all of the goodness that grains pack in their three layers. Whole grains have a tough, fibrous outer layer called bran that protects the inside of the kernel. The interior contains mostly the starchy endosperm. Its job is to provide stored energy for the germ, the seed’s reproductive kernel, which nestles inside the endosperm. The germ is rich in vitamins, minerals, and unsaturated oils.

The invention of industrialized roller mills in the late 19th century changed what we got from grains. Milling strips away the bran and germ, making the grain easier to chew, easier to digest, and easier to keep without refrigeration (the healthy oils in the germ can turn rancid, giving the grain an off taste). Processing also pulverizes the endosperm, turning it from a small, solid nugget into millions of minuscule particles. Refining wheat creates fluffy flour that makes light, airy breads and pastries. But there’s a nutritional price to be paid. The process strips away more than half of wheat’s B vitamins, 90 percent of the vitamin E, and virtually all of the fiber. It also makes the starch easily accessible to the body’s starch-digesting enzymes.

A growing body of research shows that returning to whole grains and other less-processed sources of carbohydrates improves health in myriad ways.
What Whole Grains Can Do For You

As researchers have begun to look more closely at carbohydrates and health, they are learning that the quality of the carbohydrates you eat is at least as important as the quantity. Most studies, including some from several different Harvard teams, show a connection between eating whole grains and better health.

Cardiovascular Disease

Eating whole instead of refined grains substantially lowers total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or bad) cholesterol, triglycerides, and insulin levels. Any of these changes would be expected to reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease. In the Harvard-based Nurses’ Health Study, women who ate 2 to 3 servings of whole-grain products (mostly bread and breakfast cereals) each day were 30 percent less likely to have a heart attack or die from heart disease over a 10-year period than women who ate less than 1 serving per week (1). A recent meta-analysis of seven major studies showed that cardiovascular disease (heart attack, stroke, or the need for a procedure to bypass or open a clogged artery) was 21 percent less likely in people who ate 2.5 or more servings of whole-grain foods a day compared with those who ate less than 2 servings a week (2).

Type 2 Diabetes

In a study of more than 160,000 women whose health and dietary habits were followed for up to 18 years, those who averaged 2 to 3 servings of whole grains a day were 30 percent less likely to have developed type 2 diabetes than those who rarely ate whole grains (3). When the researchers combined these results with those of several other large studies, they found that eating an extra 2 servings of whole grains a day decreased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 21 percent.

Cancer

The data on cancer are mixed, with some studies showing a protective effect and others showing none (4). A large, five-year study among nearly 500,000 men and women suggests that eating whole grains, but not dietary fiber, offers modest protection against colorectal cancer (5, 6).

Digestive Health

By keeping the stool soft and bulky, the fiber in whole grains helps prevent constipation, a common, costly, and aggravating problem. It also helps prevent diverticular disease (the development of tiny pouches inside the colon that are easily irritated and inflamed) by decreasing pressure in the intestines.

Staying Alive

An intriguing report from the Iowa Women’s Health Study linked whole-grain consumption with fewer deaths from noncardiac, noncancer causes. Compared with women who rarely or never ate whole-grain foods, those who had at least two or more servings a day were 30 percent less likely to have died from an inflammation-related condition over a 17-year period (7).

How Do Whole Grains Do This?

Whole grains don’t contain a magical nutrient that fights disease and improves health. It’s the entire package—elements intact and working together—that’s important.

The bran and fiber in whole grains make it more difficult for digestive enzymes to break down the starches into glucose. Soluble fiber helps lower cholesterol. Insoluble fiber helps move waste through the digestive tract. Fiber may also kindle the body’s natural anticoagulants and so help prevent the formation of small blood clots that can trigger heart attacks or strokes. The collection of antioxidants prevents LDL cholesterol from reacting with oxygen. Some experts think this reaction is a key early step in the development of cholesterol-clogged arteries. Phytoestrogens (plant estrogens) found in whole grains may protect against some cancers. So might essential minerals, such as magnesium, selenium, copper, and manganese. These minerals may also help reduce the risk for heart disease and diabetes. And then there are the hundreds of substances that haven’t yet been identified, some or many of which may play as-yet-undiscovered roles in health.

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/health-gains-from-whole-grains/index.html