You are browsing the archive for Mitchell Harris L.Ac, MSTOM, Author at Food from East.

Orange Pan-glazed Tempeh

Categories: Asian, Gluten-free, Qi Vacuity, Spleen Qi Vacuity, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian, Yin Vacuity

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Orange Pan-glazed Tempeh Recipe

HS note: This recipe is equally good made with tofu. I made a couple minor tweaks to the recipe based on American ingredients/measurements. You can make a meal out of this by pairing it with some lightly sauteed seasonal vegetables, or in this case I simple served if over some left-over cooked wheat berries that I heated with a bit of chopped kale.

1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice (3-4 large juicy oranges)
1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
2 teaspoons tamari (or soy sauce)
1 1/2 tablespoons mirin
2 teaspoons maple syrup
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
2 small garlic cloves, crushed
roughly 10 ounces of tempeh (or extra-firm tofu)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 lime
a handful of cilantro (coriander) leaves

Put the orange juice in a small bowl. Squeeze the grated ginger over the bowl to extract the juices, then discard the pulp. Add the tamari, mirin, and maple syrup, ground coriander, and garlic. Mix together and set aside.

Cut the tempeh (or tofu) into thin-ish, bite-sized pieces, and if working with tofu, pat dry with a paper towel.

Put the olive oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot but not smoking, add the tempeh and fry for 5 minutes, or until golden underneath. Turn and cook the other side for another 5 minutes, or until golden. Pour the orange juice mixture into the pan and simmer for 10 minutes, or until the sauce has reduced to a lovely thick glaze. Turn the tempeh once more during this time and spoon the sauce over the tofu from time to time.

Serve the tempeh drizzled with any remaining sauce and a squeeze of lime, with the coriander scattered on top. Heidi note: As I mention in the head notes, I served this over some leftover wheat berries heated with a few handfuls of chopped kale.

Serves 4. (or two if you love it as much as we did -h)

From http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/orange-panglazed-tempeh-recipe.html

Analysis – Nourishes and warms the SP/ST, moves/aids digestion.

Ginger-Scallion-Mushroom Tea

Categories: Asian, Beverages, Gluten-free, Lung Phlegm Cold, Vegan, Vegetarian, Wei Qi Vacuity, Wind Cold Invading Lungs

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Ginger-Scallion-Mushroom Tea

Here is a variation as many people don’t know what chinese dates are or where to get them….just use mushrooms instead….almost any kind will work to boost immune system (LU/KD)

6 slices ginger
3 stalks scallions
5 pieces of sliced button or shitake mushroom

Cook ginger slices, chopped scallion and sliced mushroom pieces in 3 1/2 cups of water for about 5 minutes. Strain and drink 1 cup each time, 3x a day.  Eat the ingredients if possible but not necessary

Serves: 3

Mitchell Harris L.Ac, MSTOM said:

Ginger-Scallion-Date Tea6 slices ginger
3 stalks scallions
5 pieces of black date (da zao)
Serves: 3
Cook ginger slices, chopped scallion and sliced date pieces in 3 1/2 cups of water for about 5 minutes. Strain and drink 1 cup each time, 3x a day.

Mufarraka

Categories: Blood Vacuity, Gluten-free, Liver, Mediterranean, Paleo

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Mufarraka

A great, high-cholesterol liver dish from an ancient Middle Eastern cookbook has been translated by Betty Cook. Note the inclusion of wonderful spices, not normally associated with liver.

14 ounces chicken livers
14 ounces chicken gizzards
1/2 teaspoon salt
8 egg yolks
1 1/2 teaspoon coriander
1 1/2 teaspoon cumin
3/4 teaspoon pepper
1 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons sesame oil for frying
1/4 cup lemon juice

Bring 3 cups water to a boil with 1/8 teaspoon salt, add gizzards and simmer 50 minutes. Near the end of this time, bring another 3 cups water and 1/8 teaspoon salt to a boil and cook livers in it 3 minutes. Drain both, cut into 1/2-inch by 1/2-inch pieces, put into a bowl and mix with egg yolks and spices. Heat oil and fry the mixture about 4 minutes, sprinkle with lemon juice and serve.

Cleansing Rash – Rice Dish

Categories: Gluten-free, Rice and Grains, Skin Problems, Spleen Qi Vacuity, Toxic Heat in the Blood, Vegan, Vegetarian

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Cleansing Rash – Rice Dish

Ingredients:
1-2 tsp each ground cumin, coriander, fenugreek and turmeric (you can
get these bulk at Whole Foods for cheap)
2 tsp fresh ginger, grated or mashed
1 large bay leaf
1 celery stalk, diced

1 small handful of cilantro chopped
1-2 cups mung beans (presoaked over night–read below for tips on cooking dried beans)
1 bunch kale, immersed and swished in water to remove grit, then thinly sliced
1 cup brown rice, cooked separately according to package directions

Fry the spices over medium heat in just a few teapoons of olive oil then add the celery and mung beans, covering with water plus a couple inches extra. Cover and keep at a low boil until the mung beans are soft (about 45 minutes, but if you use presoaked beans maybe shorter time till cooked).

Add the cooked rice and kale and simmer until the kale turns bright green. Salt and pepper to taste.

Mitch Harris

TCM ANALYSIS

The brown rice, and all strengthen the digestive qi to boost immune system, while the spices serve to boost digestive enzyme activity helping you better absorb nutrients. The kale will help support your blood. The mung beans, cilantro and celery will help clear the heat and inflammation to help the rash.

Hope it turns out well~

Celery Cherry Salad

Categories: Kidney Qi Vacuity, Kidney Yin Vacuity, Salad

Fenland Celery

rving Size 2-3

3/4 cup sliced celery
1/3 cup dried sweet cherries
1/3 cup frozen green peas, thawed

3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1 tablespoon chopped pecans, toasted
1 1/2 tablespoons mayonnaise
1 1/2 tablespoons plain yogurt
1 1/2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper

This Recipe supports a Kidney- Spleen Xu Pattern.

Directions
In a medium bowl, combine the celery, cherries, peas, parsley and pecans. Stir in the mayonnaise, yogurt and lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper. Chill before serving

celery-ton KD, Ton SP/ST
sweet cherries- Ton SP, Stim Appetite, Ton Yin
green peas, thawed- Ton MJ,
parsley- Food Stagnation, Regulates Qi
pecans, toasted- Ton Qi, Ton LU, Ton KD
mayonnaise-
yogurt
lemon juice- Ton Yin, Reg LV, Harmon ST
salt- Ton KD
black pepper- Helps with Diarrhea

 

What do you think about cooking vegetables in a microwave?

Categories: Articles, Cooking tips, Food Safety, Vegetables, Vegetarian

For The Vegetarians: Red Curry Kohlrabi

For The Vegetarians: Red Curry KohlrabiHealthy Food Tip

What do you think about cooking vegetables in a microwave?

We get many questions about whether we recommend cooking vegetables in a microwave. As you will see throughout our website, light steaming is our cooking method of choice for most vegetables. Loss of nutrients in the microwave depends on the same factors involved with loss of nutrients on the stovetop.

To predict the nutrient loss, it’s important to know answers to questions like: “Is the vegetable placed in water? How much water? To what temperature are the vegetable and water heated? For how long? We’ve seen studies showing minimal loss of nutrients from microwaved vegetables, and we’ve also seen studies showing substantial loss. In general, we prefer stovetop steaming that can be accomplished in as little time as microwaving while providing a more even heat.

http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=newtip&dbid=38&utm_source=daily_click&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_email

Are the carbs in vegetables the same cooked or uncooked?

Carbs (carbohydrates) in vegetables can definitely be affected by cooking. They are not affected as quickly or as extensively as phytonutrients like flavonoids or carotenoids, but they are still subject to changes from baking, boiling, steaming, and roasting. The exact impact of cooking on vegetables-and on other foods as well -depends on how long you cook them, how high a temperature you cook them at, and how much moisture you use when cooking them. But here are some basics about vegetables, cooking, and carbs that you should know.

Conversion of starch to sugar

Heat can help increase the rate at which vegetable starches get converted into vegetable sugars. A baked Russet potato, for example, will lose about 10% of its raw-form total starch content and convert that starch content into sugar. From a nutritional perspective, this loss of starch and increase in sugar is relatively small and not typically a cause for great concern. However, the baking of a starchy vegetable can also raise its glycemic index (GI) value. This increase in GI (often related to the conversion of starches to sugars) holds true for vegetables like potatoes, sweet potatoes, yams, plaintains, and carrots. A raw carrot typically has a GI value in the 15-20 range. A cooked carrot’s GI will typically fall into the 35-50 range. (You can find a reliable list of GI values in the website established by David Mendosa and based on research at the University of Sydney in Australia at http://www.mendosa.com/gilists.htm.)

Changes in resistant starch

Research studies show definite changes in levels of resistant starch naturally occurring in vegetables (and other foods). Resistant starches are generally viewed as helpful carbohydrates that resist breakdown in the digestive tract long enough to reach the large intestine and support the metabolic needs of helpful bacteria and cells lining the large intestine. However, the precise relationship between vegetable cooking and resistant starch is not yet clear. In some cases, the cooking of vegetables has presented some very favorable results with respect to the amount of available resistant starches. In other cases, no change in resistant starch levels has been determined to result from cooking. While the jury is still out in this area of research, look for future studies about the impact of cooking on the levels of resistant starch in vegetables and other foods.

Dry versus liquid heat

When vegetables are boiled in water, some of their sugars and starches are lost into the cooking water. When vegetables are roasted or baked in the oven, this loss of sugars and starches into water does not take place. For this reason, vegetables like boiled green beans will typically lose a small percent of both sugars and starches into the cooking water, whereas oven-roasted green beans will not. However, these changes in carbohydrate composition are once again relatively small and not usually a major factor in deciding about cooking method.

WHFoods Recommendations

When it comes to their carb content, vegetables can generally be enjoyed without problems in either cooked or raw form. Ratios of sugar to starch may change during cooking, as can amounts of available resistant starch and GI value. Among all of these factors, GI value may be the most important factor to consider for individuals who are following a diet that is focused on blood sugar control and insulin balance.

photo by: Tobyotter

CAN COFFEE AND TEA HELP PREVENT KIDNEY STONES?

Categories: Articles, Beverages, Food Education, Kidney Stones, Research Studies

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http://www.prnewswire.co.uk/cgi/news/release?id=30199

 

coffee cupCAN COFFEE AND TEA HELP PREVENT KIDNEY STONES?

Kidney stones are common, painful and expensive to treat. It is estimated that about three people in every 100 in the UK will suffer from them.

And Koo Stark, former girlfriend of Prince Andrew and herself a sufferer, recently revealed in ‘Hello’ magazine that the condition will prevent her having the home birth she would have preferred for the baby she is carrying.

But according to a new report drinking plenty of coffee, tea, beer or wine could reduce the risk of getting a kidney stone while apple juice and grapefruit juice could, however, increase the risk.

The finding comes from a six-year survey of more than 45,000 American men, aged 40 to 75, by a team from the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA. The survey is part of a long-term study of cancer, heart and other diseases in which more than 50,000 health professionals are taking part.

Their drinking habits, with 21 different beverages from water to hard spirits, were compared with the development of 753 kidney stones among the men, none of whom had had one before.

After allowing for other effects, including other elements of the diet, the Harvard team put the decrease in risk at 10% for each 240ml (just over one and half cups) of coffee a day and 14% for tea. The same amount of beer (under half a pint) gave a reduced risk of 21% and of wine 39%. The risk increased by 35% for each 240ml of apple juice, and 37% for 240ml of grapefruit juice.

While the survey was on men over 40 who had not had a stone there was no reason to believe the findings would be any different for women, younger men or men who had already had kidney stones containing calcium oxalate.

The Harvard team suggest that caffeine interferes with the action of a urine-reducing hormone on the kidneys, while alcohol slows production of the hormone, resulting in more and weaker urine with less chance of crystals forming. More research is needed, they say.

Patients are usually advised to drink a lot to increase the volume of their urine, but this does not always work in preventing another stone. It would seem that what people drink could be as important as how much they drink.

Note to Editors:

Known medically as calculi, kidney stones may be formed due to an infection in the urinary tract or from an excess of salts in the bloodstream which crystallise in the urine. Stones which remain in the kidney may cause no discomfort but even a small stone on the move to the bladder can cause excruciating pain by tearing the lining of the urinary tract.

Distributed by PR Newswire on behalf of Coffee News Information Service


Contact details for all releases are only available to the media via PR Newswire for Journalists.


photo by: Moyan_Brenn

30 day cleanse (non-grain)

Categories: Blogs, Cleanse, Food Culture, Paleo

Whole9life website

Whole9life websitehttp://whole9life.com/resources/

From Josylnn Adams

MSG and what it is

Categories: Asian, Food Safety, Western Medicine

http://www.msgtruth.org/whatisit.htm

Great summary of TCM food basics

Categories: Articles, Asian, Eastern Nutrition, Food Energetics

http://www.shen-nong.com/eng/lifestyles/food_property_food_tcm.html