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Spicy Cumin Eggplant

Categories: Blood Stasis, Gluten-free, Indian, Liver Blood Stasis, Liver Qi Stagnation, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian

EggplantPan

SPICY CUMIN EGGPLANT

1 medium eggplant, peeled
1 bell pepper, chopped
4 tbsp sunflower oil
¾ tsp cumin seeds
½ tsp mustard seeds
½ tsp tumeric
1/8 tsp hing (asafetida)
1 tsp sea salt
½ cup chick pea flour
1 tbsp onion chopped
½ tsp chilli powder
2 tsp coriander powder

wash and peel eggplant, cut into 1 inch cubes. In heavy skillet, heat oil, add mustard seeds and cumin seeds. When the mustard seeds pop, add turmeric, hing, onion and pepper. Then add eggplant and salt, mix well. Cover and cook 5 min. eggplant gets soft. Remove lid and add chickpea flour and remaining ingredients. Mix well and cook uncovered 5-7 min over medium heat. Stir so flour will not stick or burn. Serve with dal and rice, barley or millet.

By Anna Strong

TCM ANALYSIS

Eggplant: sweet, light, oily, cool. SP/ST/LI. Clears heat, moves blood, breaks stasis.
Bell pepper: sweet, oily, warm. Invigorates qi.
Turmeric: warming, bitter. Reduces tumors, decongests liver.
Cumin: warming
Sea salt: cold, salty. Cools heat, cools blood.
Mustard seeds: warming benefit lung
Chilli powder: acrid, hot.

Overall analysis:
The dish balances itself nicely with a combination of warming spices and cooling eggplant. The eggplant and turmeric both work well for blood stasis breaking.

Tzatziki: Cucumber and Yogurt Salad

Categories: Indian, Mediterranean, Side Dishes, Stomach Fire, Vacuity Heat, Yin Vacuity

Tzatziki

Tzatziki: Cucumber and Yogurt Salad (also known as Raita)

ingredients:
2 large cucumbers, washed well, quartered lengthwise and then sliced as thin as possible
1/2 cup greek yogurt
5-6 minced fresh mint leaves
pinch salt
optional: 1/2 tsp rosewater

mix all ingredients well in a large bowl. can be served with torn fresh lettuce or as a side or condiment. makes about 3 cups.

analysis: cucumbers are cooling and sweet and relieve stomach inflammation. yogurt is sweet and neutral and nourishes yin and quenches fire. mint is cool and pungent; it helps relieve stomach inflammation and stops pain by moving qi. rose water is sweet and pungent and moves qi, helping to relieve pain. the scent is said to calm the mind.

Warming fennel lamb

Categories: Cold, Indian, Kidney Yang Vacuity, Lamb, Meat, Paleo, Qi Stagnation, Stomach Cold

lamb-juniper-fennel

Warming Fennel Lamb

Ingredients:
1 lb. Lamb, cut into ¾ inch cubes
1 TBL. Ground cumin
2 tsp. Rice wine
½ Medium-size green onion, chopped into ¼ in. pcs.
2 TBL. Olive oil
1 inch or piece fresh ginger, peeled & minced
Salt to taste
1 tsp. Fennel seeds
1 Ground chili pepper (fresh or dried)

Directions:
1. Place the lamb in a large bowl. Sprinkle with the cumin, rice wine, & green onions as you stir the lamb. Mix well for a few minutes so that the lamb is evenly coated.
2. Heat the oil in a skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the ginger & cook for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the lamb mixture & stir-fry for about 5 minutes, until nearly done.
3. One minute before removing the pan from the stove, add the fennel seeds & chili pepper & stir well. Serve.

Lamb: Hot & sweet, tonifies kidney weakness, dispels cold, strengthens & nourish qi & blood.
Cumin: Warming, pungent, sweet, stimulates digestion & warms the middle jiao.
Rice Wine: Cooling, sweet & sour, enriches Yin & promotes circulation.
Green onion: Hot & pungent, resolves phlegm & expels pathogens.
Olive oil: Moistening generates fluids.
Ginger: Warm & pungent, promotes sweating, benefits lung & stomach, dispel coldness.
Fennel Seeds: Warm & pungent, unblocks & regulates qi, strengthens stomach, & dispels cold.
Chili Pepper: Warming, sweet, pungent, bitter, moves qi & blood.

TCM: This dish strengthens kidney yang, disperses cold, strengthens qi & nourishes blood.

Seasoned lamb

Categories: Indian, Kidney Yang Vacuity, Lamb

lamb

Seasoned Lamb

Serving Size 4

1/2 cup plain yogurt
1/4 cup water
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon distilled white vinegar
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 cup chopped onion
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
5 pounds boneless lamb shoulder, cut into 1/4-inch-thick strips

Directions
Place the yogurt, water, lemon juice, vinegar, olive oil, onion, and garlic into a large mixing bowl. Whisk in the salt, black pepper, cumin, nutmeg, clove, mace, and cayenne pepper until evenly blended. Mix in the lamb strips to coat. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap, and marinate in the refrigerator 12 to 24 hours (the longer the better).
Heat a large skillet over high heat. Cook the lamb strips in a single layer in batches until the fat melts and the meat has browned and is no longer pink on the inside, about 5 minutes, turning occasionally.

This meal is design for a Kidney Yang Xu pattern. The bulk of the recipe is the lamb which is a big Kidney Yang tonifier.

lemon juice- tonifies yin, regulates liver, harmonizes stomach
white vinegar- invigorates blood
olive oil- clears heat, tonifies yin
onion- phlegm
garlic- food and blood stagnation
salt- tonifies kidney
black pepper- helps with diarrhea
cloves- sends Qi down, stops pain
cayenne pepper- helps with diarrhea
lamb – tonifies qi and yang, tonifies Kidney

Cucumber Raita

Categories: Dryness, Heart Fire, Heart Yin Vacuity, Indian, Large Intestine Heat, Liver Yang Rising, Lung Yin Vacuity, Side Dishes, Stomach Fire, Stomach Yin Vacuity, Vacuity Heat, Vegetarian, Yin Vacuity

raita

Cucumber Raita

Prep time: 10 mins
Serves: 4

Ingredients:
1-teaspoon cumin seeds
2 cucumbers
1 ½ cups yogurt
¼ teaspoon salt

Method:
Dry roast the cumin seeds until they are slightly browned, then crush them with a rolling pin or mortar and pestle. Grate or finely shred the cucumber, combine with the other indigents and let the mixture sit for half an hour or so before serving.

Cucumber is cooling, sweet and cleansing and will relieve heat throughout the body. Its moistening thirst-relieving nature will benefit dryness and it has an uplifting affect on the heart and relieves irritability
Yogurt is also moistening and cooling with special benefits for the intestines.
Cumin slightly moderates the coolness of this dish and counteracts the dampening nature of the yogurt

Primary Actions: Yin, Heat, and Dryness
Primary Influences: Lung, Intestines, Stomach, Spleen, Heart

Contraindicated: Yang xu, Damp, Cold

Curd, buttermilk and the Nobel Prize of 1908

Categories: Articles, Indian, Nutritional Information, Western Medicine

Interesting article on pro and pre biotics, and a reminder of how variety, and a little bit of bacteria in our food is a good thing…

(Granted, the dairy thing may not fly with TCM, but this is a food eaten with hot-spicy foods in a hot-dry climate, so there’s some balance there.)

http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/article2299567.ece

Ayervedic ideas for Fertility

Categories: Articles, Food Culture, Food Energetics, Indian, Infertility

I want to recommend you begin to cook with butter and ghee for fertility especially for wood overacting type clients. They is considered very nourishing to add more “cushion” and earth material to their system. Highly concentrated and healthy, natural fats are good for you at this time. I can’t imagine would be come overly obese so this is fine for them unless you have short term concerns for cholesterol. If you have any questions let me know. Otherwise enjoy!

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-ghee.htm

I found this thread about fertility from an Indian medical perspective. Some nice ideas for you and the husband. If you don’t know the herbs just use the ones you can. If your husband ever wants a consult let me know also. It takes two to tango )

“Ojas and Shukra/Artava is the key to fertility (vajikarana) in Ayurveda. Eat ghee on rice and cook with it in general, drink warm milk with raw sugar or honey, blend it or cook it with Shatavari, and Vidhari (wild yam). Also you can soak
over night and peel in the morning ten almonds, add a pinch of cardamom, saffron, and a tsp of raw sugar and blend with hot milk. Practice Yoga Assanas especially ones that bend at the waist and abdomen, like yoga Mudra, Durga Pranam, and Cobra. Loosely fill a jar with dates (w/o pits) than fill it with warm ghee so that it takes up the rest of the air space. Mix in ½ tsp of nutmeg and cardamom, add a nice pinch of Saffron, let it sit for a week, than eat one ghee soaked date per day, it can be eaten with soaked & peeled almonds or warm milk, or alone, it’s a nice rejuvenative for any after sex food cravings. Cook with wild yam in soups.
For him: Eat plenty of Urud dhal, soak them and make them into idly or Dosa, Urud dhal roasted in ghee and than cooked with milk and raw sugar is great if you can make it palatable. Make the above Almond milk shake but add, ¼ teaspoon of each: Ashwaganda, Bala, Gokshura, Vidhari, Shatavri, Kapi Kachu, Shimula, Maca, Suma, American Ginseng, ( I call
this the Super Man formula) Its better to mix these herbs ahead of time and just add a tablespoon as needed. Eat plenty of sweet potatoes and pumpkin. Dates and figs are also good food for this. Massage the body with warm sesame oil , especially over abdomen a couple times per week, before a warm shower.

Indian Cooking; Nutrition Info

Categories: Articles, Asian, Cooking tips, Food Culture, Indian, Nutritional Information, Western Medicine

This is not how I normally like to look at food, through caloric and fat content counting, but it is useful info to look over to get an idea of what you are putting in your body. I eat mostly vegetarian (flexitarian really) and just a friend just moved to the Devon area. This is THE Indian and Pakistani area of Chicago and so I have been eating rich, delicious vegetarian Indian food just about every night. I hope to cook some tasty, nutritious meals in this style soon. Until there here are a few ideas and tips for those who want to explore this “other” Eastern Culture’s food. It is a deep well to explore. Good Indian is some of the most rich and delicious of meals, maybe because of Yin nourishing aspect and fat content. I don’t know about some of the claims below, but worth noting. Feel free to comment. ~ Enjoy

 

Mitch

_____________

Nutrition data (calories, carbohydrates, protein) of homemade Indian food are given. Also the ways to preserve nutrition in Indian cooking are discussed.

Many Indian are vegetarians and they eat vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and plant-based proteins. These foods contain essential micro-nutrients and vitamins that produce antioxidants which are good for heart, blood pressure and diabetes.

But Indians, in general, consume less amount of vegetables {says who?}. Also reheating of vegetarian dishes, a common practice among Indians, destroys the micro-nutrients. “Indians, therefore, face heart attacks five years earlier than people in the West,” according to Dr Deepak Natarajan of Apollo hospital, Delhi.

Diets rich in saturated fats and hypertension are the main reason for this.

Indian Cooking & Nutrition

http://www.fatfreekitchen.com/nutrition/indian-foods.html

By 2010, India will carry 60 percent of the world’s heart disease burden, nearly four times more than its share of the global population, according to a study released by Denis Xavier of St. John’s National Academy of Health Sciences in Bangalore in April 2008.

  • Calories in Indian foods and their nutrition depend on the way the foods are cooked.
  • An Indian dish may be very high in calories/energy (mostly from fat) if it is cooked by deep frying, or it may be low in calories or fat if it is stir fried or baked.
  • The rich creamy dishes containing foods covered with lot of spice colored liquid are often very high in fat (mostly saturated fat and trans-fat), while the tandoori dishes are low in fat.

    The research (Feb 2010) conducted by “Which” magazine of Britain found that a single meal of Indian curry in Britain has more fat than the recommendation for the entire day, an average takeaway contained 23.2gm of saturated fat, 3.2gm more than a woman should eat in a day.  Indian takeaway meals are known for their liberal use of ghee and oil, not only in curries but also breads. The researchers found that a naan contained more calories than a chicken tikka masala.

  • Indian often reheat the food, the reheating destroys the nutrients of the food.
  • Indian food is often overcooked, destroying its nutrition.
  • The North Indian dishes are very rich in taste and presentation as compared to South Indian food. The North Indian foods, especially Punjabi foods, are generally higher in calories and fat and lower in nutritional value, than South Indian foods because Punjabi cooking involves tarka or vaghar (frying of spices, onions, etc.) in pure ghee (high in
    saturated fat), butter, oil or trans fats or trans-fatty acids (hydrogenated oils and fats, dalda) that gives unique Indian taste and texture. Read more on trans fats in Indian foods.
  • The tandoori foods of North India are rich in nutrition and natural flavours, but often these are loaded with fats. A new research reported at a conference on “Fats and trans-fatty acids in Indian diet” at the Seventh Health Writers Workshop organised by Health Essayists and Authors League (HEAL) in 2007 found that the trans-fatty acids in French fries is 4.2% – 6.1%, it is 9.5% in bhatura, 7.8% in paratha and 7.6% each in puri and tikkis.

How to Preserve Nutrition in Indian Cooking?

The health benefits of the Indian food depend on the method of cooking.

  1. If a recipe calls for too much cream, yogurt, ghee or oil and crushed cashews, then the dish will be very rich in taste and texture, but with out any nutritional value. The north Indian food, Punjabi food and the foods available in restaurants are cooked (rather over-cooked) like this and they are higher in fat and lower in nutritional value. These foods are generally prepared with deep frying onions, ginger, and spices in lot of oil or ghee. Read more on Indian
    food nutrition and calories
    .
  2. Instead of deep frying, you can stir-fry or saute them in very little vegetable oil. The over-cooked foods lose their nutrition because, in the process, the vitamins and minerals are leached out. You should leave the cooking of a vegetable when it is still crisp.
  3. Never use trans-fat or vanaspati like dalda, rath, etcfor cooking, these are not healthy. Many restaurants and shops use trans-fats for cooking tikkis, bhaturas, parathas, puri (poori) and even sweets and vegetable curries
  4. Do not chop the vegetbles into too small pieces. The vegetable will lose its nutrients if it has more exposed surfaces to the atmosphere.
  5. Always chop the vegetables only when you cook them, do not chop and leave them for a long time.
  6. Do not wash the vegetables like spinach, zucchini, lauki, etc. after chopping to preserve their nutrients.
  7. When you stir-fry, do not overheat the oil.
  8. If you make pakoras, keep the besan batter thick. Deep frying of thin batter pakoras absorb too much oil during frying.
  9. Do not add ghee or oil for making the dough of poori, otherwise the pooris will absorb too much oil during frying.

However, it is possible to have traditional Indian cooking recipes that produce tasty dishes with very less fat and keeping the natural nutrition values and low calories.