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Chicken Noodle Soup for the Common Cold

Categories: Asian, Chicken, Gluten-free, Soup, Wei Qi Vacuity, Wind Cold Invading Lungs, Wind Invasion (External)

chicksoup

CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP FOR THE COMMON COLD serves 4

  • 2 tbs coconut oil
  • ¼ lb chicken, shredded
  • ¼ c preserved mustard greens, soaked, rinsed, and shredded
  • 4 slices ginger, shredded
  • 2 green onions, sliced thinly
  • 1-2 tbs fermented black beans, soaked, rinsed, and chopped
  • 4 c chicken stock
  • 1 tbs soy sauce
  • 2 tsp sesame oil
  • 2 oz rice vermicelli, presoaked in hot water until soft, drained
  • Fresh perilla leaves (or substitute with cilantro or basil)

1) Heat oil until smoking. Add chicken for 30 seconds. Add ginger, onions, greens, and black beans and stir fry for a few seconds.

2) Add chicken stock, bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 5 min. add the soy sauce and sesame oil.

3) Divide noodles between 4 bowls, top with a handful of perilla leaves, and ladle the hot soup over the top.

 

EARLY WIND COLD INVASION

Coconut oil: warm, sweet; strengthening, moistening

Chicken: warm, sweet; tonifies Qi and Blood

Preserved Mustard greens: warm, acrid, salty; relieves common cold, ventilates Lungs, reduces swollen glands

Ginger: warm, acrid; LU, SP, ST; promotes sweating, expels pathogen, opens LU

Green Onion: hot, acrid; LU, ST; promotes sweating, expels external pathogen

Fermented Black beans: warm, sweet, slightly bitter; LU, ST; releases exterior, illuminates irritability

Soy sauce: cool, sweet, salty; clears heat

Sesame oil: warm, sweet; harmonizes Blood, lubricates intestines

Perilla Leaf: warm, acrid, aromatic; LU, SP; releases exterior, opens chest, moves QI

Rice noodles: sweet; tonifies SP, ST; nourishes QI

 

This recipe contains ingredients that disperse external pathogens but also treat an underlying deficiency of Wei Qi. It’s useful during the cold and flu season as a prophylactic tonic and in the early stages of the common cold.

Jason Cox

Black Soybean and Kabocha Squash Stew

Categories: Spleen Qi Vacuity, Wind Invasion (External)

Black Soybean and Kabocha Squash Stew

(Serves 4)

Ingredients:
1 cup dried black soybeans
1 inch piece kombu seaweed
2 tablespoons olive oil
2-3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
1 red onion, diced
1 teaspoon chili powder
Fine Sea Salt
Pinch of crushed red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon ground cumin
2 1/2 cups canned diced tomatoes
1/2 kabocha squash, halved, seeded, and cut into 1 inch pieces
1 cup mirin
2 teaspoons white miso
2 celery stalks, diced
3-4 fresh cilantro sprigs, chopped

Preparation:
Rinse the soybeans, then turn them out onto a kitchen towel and rub to remove as much moisture as possible. Place the beans in a dry, medium skillet, and pan-toast them over medium-low heat for 5-10 minutes, until they puff up a little and their skins begin to split.
Transfer the beans to a large pot, and add the kombu and 3 cups of water. Bring to a boil, then cover, reduce the heat to low, and cook for 90 minutes or until the bean are tender.
While the beans cook, combine the oil, garlic, onion, and chili powder in a large skillet over medium heat. When you hear the onion start to sizzle, add a pinch of salt, red-pepper flakes, and cumin to cook, stirring frequently, for 2-3 minutes. Add the tomatoes, squash, mirin, and 1 cup of water. Bring to a boil, cover, and reduce the heat to low. Cook until the squash is tender, about 35 minutes. Remove a small amount of the broth from the skillet and use this to dissolve the miso. Once dissolved, stir the miso into the vegetables.
Once the beans are fully cooked, drain them of any leftover liquid. Add the bean to the vegetables, and simmer over low heat until all remaining liquid has been absorbed. Turn off he heat, stiff in the celery and cilantro, and server hot.

Analysis:

kabocha squash: nourishes middle jiao, harmonizes ST
dried black soybeans- Bland and neutral, releases exterior, settles restlessness, goes to LU
kombu seaweed- Cold and salty, softens hardness, clear heat, detoxifies, benefits the thyroid glad, protects from radioactivity, benefits the lymphatic system, promotes diuresis, and provides many minerals
tomatoes- Sl. cool, sweet and sour, promotes body fluids, quenches thirst, strengthens ST, aids digestion, cools blood, clears heat, detoxifies, calms the LV, removes stagnant food
celery- cool, sweet, and sl. bitter, tonifies KD, stops bleeding, strengthens SP and ST, clears heat, lowers blood pressure, promotes diuresis, benefits blood.

 

Overall this recipe promotes body fluids by nourishing middle jiao and the soybeans go to the LU to help release the exterior.

Mung Bean Sprout Salad

Categories: Large Intestine Qi Stagnation, Wind Heat Invading Lungs, Wind Invasion (External)

Mung Bean Sprout Salad
Overall recipe: Releases exterior, resolves toxin, clears heat.

Mung Bean Sprouts: sweet, cool. Clears heat, resolves toxins, disperses summer-heat.
Scallion: acrid, warm. Releases exterior, resolves toxin
Sesame Seed: sweet, neutral. Moistens interior, supplements liver and kidney.
Sesame Oil: sweet cool. Detoxifies, moistens dryness, promotes bowel movement.
Ginger: acrid, slightly warm. Disperses cold, releases exterior, transforms phlegm, stops vomit.
Vinegar: sour, bitter, warm. Resolves toxin, kills worms, scatters stasis.
Garlic: acrid, warm. Courses qi, resolves toxin, kills parasites.
Honey: sweet, neutral. Resolves toxin, moistens dryness, strengthens the center.

Emily Hildebrand said:

Mung Bean Sprout Salad
Serves 46 cups mung bean sprouts
1 bunch of scallions, finely chopped
1 Tbsp sesame seeds

Dressing:
1 tsp grated ginger
1 tsp sesame seed oil
2 Tbsp raw apple cider vinegar
1/2 clove garlic, minced
1 tsp raw honey
1 tsp flax oil
a healthy drizzle of olive oil
Whisk the dressing ingredients together and pour over the sprouts etc.

Taken from Sally Fallon’s ‘Nourishing Traditions’

Soul Food for Wind-Cold Invading Lungs: Grits and Greens

Categories: Lung Qi Vacuity, Spleen Qi Vacuity, Wind Cold Invading Lungs, Wind Invasion (External)

Soul Food for Wind-Cold Invading Lungs: Grits and Greens
By Sue Cook

Ingredients:
GREENS:
3 inch piece fresh ginger
2 bunches fresh mustard greens
1 large purple onion
5 Chinese dates (complicated version) or 1 T raw brown sugar (easy version)
either 1 cup water plus 3 dried shiitakes (complicated version) or 2 T extra virgin olive oil plus 1 cup water
tamari or Bragg’s Liquid Aminos
GRITS:
1 c stone-ground yellow grits (polenta)
3 c water
1 tsp salt

PREPARATION: easy level
In a 2-4 quart saucepan with a lid, bring 3 cups water to a boil. Slowly pour in one cup of grits, stirring constantly to prevent clumps or a volcanic-type explosion. Lower heat to medium and stir for a few minutes, then turn off the flame and cover to finish cooking.
Rinse the greens thoroughly by completely submerging in a full sink of water and swishing to remove any grit. Remove from water and set in drainer.
First cut the root end off the onion, then cut in half lengthwise. Remove the skin. Trim off the top of the onion. Cut into pinky-finger thick slices.
Slice the ginger very thinly.
In a large pot that has a lid, heat the olive oil over a medium-high flame. Add the onions and stir occasionally until they begin to soften and brown slightly. Add the water and ginger and let boil for about 5 minutes.
Meanwhile, tear the greens into pieces, discarding the ends of the stems.
Add the greens to the onion mixture, stir a few times, and cover. Let the greens steam for about 3 minutes, then turn off the heat and remove the lid. Season with a small amount of brown sugar and tamari. Serve over grits.
COMPLICATED PREPARATION
Prepare grits as above. Wash greens and tear into pieces, discarding stems.
In a large pan, boil the thinly sliced ginger, the dates, and the shiitakes in a quart of water until it is reduced to approximately one cup. Strain and return to the pot.
Slice the onions and add to the ginger broth. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly until most of the liquid is evaporated. Add the greens to the pot , stir, and cover to steam for 3-4 minutes. Turn off the heat and season to taste with tamari. Serve over grits.

ANALYSIS
ginger: acrid, warm. enters LU/SP/ST. releases exterior; warms lungs and stops cough
mustard greens: acrid, warm. enters LU/LI. expels wind/cold/damp; warms lung, opens chest, stops cough.
onion: acrid, neutral. enters LU/ST. Transforms phlegm and damp.
Chinese dates: sweet, warm. enter SP/ST. tonify Spleen qi; protect middle burner from acrid ingredients; with fresh ginger, harmonize nutritive and protective qi.
shiitakes: sweet, neutral. enter SP/LU. Boost protective qi.
tamari: salty, cold. Enters SP/ST/KD. Protects middle burner. tastes good.
corn: sweet, bland, neutral. enters SP/ST. Drains damp through diuresis. Supports spleen to support the lungs.

Overall Analysis of recipe: tonifies SP and LU, expel phlegm, promote urination, resolves cough. Slight release exterior quality. If more SP tonification is needed add Sweet potato (with cinnamon).

String Beans With Ginger and Garlic

Categories: Bi Syndrome Cold, Kidney Yang Vacuity, Lung Qi Vacuity, Spleen Qi Vacuity, Spleen Yang Vacuity, Wind Invasion (External)

String Beans With Ginger and Garlic

Ingredients

* Salt
* 2 1/2 pounds string beans (French-style slim haricots verts work especially well), trimmed
* 4 tablespoons vegetable oil
* 1/4 cup minced fresh ginger (about 6 inches ginger root, peeled)
* 4 medium-size garlic cloves, minced

Preparation

1.
Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, and fill a large bowl with ice water. Working in two batches, boil beans until just tender but still crisp and bright green. Start testing after 4 minutes or so, being careful not to overcook. When done, plunge beans into ice water to stop cooking, lift out immediately when cool and drain on towels. (Recipe can be made to this point up to a day in advance and kept refrigerated, wrapped in towels.)
2.
When ready to cook, heat 2 tablespoons oil in a wide skillet over high heat. Add half the beans, half the ginger and half the garlic, and cook, stirring and tossing constantly, until beans are heated through and ginger and garlic are softened and aromatic. Sprinkle with salt, and remove to a serving dish. Repeat with remaining oil, beans, ginger and garlic. Serve.

YIELD
10 servings

Editor’s note:  No information included with this recipe.  Green beans go to Liver, Kidney, Bladder and are neutral and sweet combined with the acridity and heat of the ginger and garlic.  The recipe still goes to the warm and acrid side since the green beans are neutral.  Releases the exterior, transforms fluids to tonify Taiyin Lung and Spleen, warms Spleen and Kidney yang.

 

Miso Soup

Categories: Wei Qi Vacuity, Wind Cold Invading Lungs, Wind Heat Invading Lungs, Wind Invasion (External)

From http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/miso-soup-recipe.html

Miso Soup Recipe

Miso Choice: This time around I used an organic white miso, but I’d encourage you to experiment with a range of misos.

3 ounces dried soba noodles
2 – 4 tablespoons miso paste (to taste)
2 – 3 ounces firm tofu (2 handfuls), chopped into 1/3-inch cubes
a handful of watercress or spinach, well washed and stems trimmed
2 green onions, tops removed thinly sliced
a small handful of cilantro
a pinch of red pepper flakes

Cook the soba noodles in salted water, drain, run cold water over the noodles to stop them from cooking, shake off any excess water and set aside.

In a medium sauce pan bring 4 cups of water to a boil. Reduce the heat to a gentle simmer and remove from heat. Pour a bit of the hot water into a small bowl and whisk in the miso paste – so it thins out a bit (this step is to avoid clumping). Stir this back into the pot. Taste, and then add more (the same way) a bit at a time until it is to your liking. Also, some miso pastes are less-salty than others, so you may need to add a bit of salt here. Add the tofu, remove from the heat, and let it sit for just a minute or so.

Split the noodles between two (or three) bowls, and pour the miso broth and tofu over them. Add some watercress, green onions, cilantro, and red pepper flakes to each bowl and enjoy.

Serves 2 – 3.

Analysis – Great for supporting LU function at onset of Wind Cold or Wind Heat – gently and lightly releases the exterior, moves qi and warms and cools simultaneously.