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Shiitake and Shan Zha Congee

Categories: Heart Blood Stagnation, High blood pressure, High cholesterol, Large Intestine Qi Stagnation, Lung Qi Vacuity, Spleen Qi Vacuity, Stomach Food Retention, Wei Qi Vacuity

Shiitake and Shan Zha Congee

 

Spleen Qi Vacuity with high cholesterol

Function: strengthen SP, help digestion, regulate qi and relieve stagnation.  It could use for sp/st xu with blood stasis and to lower LDL.

Ingredients : shan zha 15g, shiitake 10g, Geng mi 50g, sugar 1/2 tbs ,Water – enough amount to create congee
Serves: 3-5 people

How to cook:
1. soak shan zha, shiitake in warm water about 30 minutes then drain out water
2. in another pot make shan zha and shitake as tea , then add geng mi and sugar to make as congee

Function of ingredients:
Shan zha: disperse food stagnation, dissipate blood stasis, reduce blood pressure and cholesterol
Shiitake (xiang gu): sweet, neutral/ Spleen, Lung, strengthen qi, boost wei qi; lower cholesterol and prevent cancer
Geng mi: supplements the center and boots qi, fortify the Spleen and harmonize the Stomach

Chicken Noodle Soup for the Common Cold

Categories: Asian, Chicken, Gluten-free, Soup, Wei Qi Vacuity, Wind Cold Invading Lungs, Wind Invasion (External)

chicksoup

CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP FOR THE COMMON COLD serves 4

  • 2 tbs coconut oil
  • ¼ lb chicken, shredded
  • ¼ c preserved mustard greens, soaked, rinsed, and shredded
  • 4 slices ginger, shredded
  • 2 green onions, sliced thinly
  • 1-2 tbs fermented black beans, soaked, rinsed, and chopped
  • 4 c chicken stock
  • 1 tbs soy sauce
  • 2 tsp sesame oil
  • 2 oz rice vermicelli, presoaked in hot water until soft, drained
  • Fresh perilla leaves (or substitute with cilantro or basil)

1) Heat oil until smoking. Add chicken for 30 seconds. Add ginger, onions, greens, and black beans and stir fry for a few seconds.

2) Add chicken stock, bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 5 min. add the soy sauce and sesame oil.

3) Divide noodles between 4 bowls, top with a handful of perilla leaves, and ladle the hot soup over the top.

 

EARLY WIND COLD INVASION

Coconut oil: warm, sweet; strengthening, moistening

Chicken: warm, sweet; tonifies Qi and Blood

Preserved Mustard greens: warm, acrid, salty; relieves common cold, ventilates Lungs, reduces swollen glands

Ginger: warm, acrid; LU, SP, ST; promotes sweating, expels pathogen, opens LU

Green Onion: hot, acrid; LU, ST; promotes sweating, expels external pathogen

Fermented Black beans: warm, sweet, slightly bitter; LU, ST; releases exterior, illuminates irritability

Soy sauce: cool, sweet, salty; clears heat

Sesame oil: warm, sweet; harmonizes Blood, lubricates intestines

Perilla Leaf: warm, acrid, aromatic; LU, SP; releases exterior, opens chest, moves QI

Rice noodles: sweet; tonifies SP, ST; nourishes QI

 

This recipe contains ingredients that disperse external pathogens but also treat an underlying deficiency of Wei Qi. It’s useful during the cold and flu season as a prophylactic tonic and in the early stages of the common cold.

Jason Cox

Cold Winter Congee

Categories: Lung Qi Vacuity, Spleen Qi Vacuity, Spleen Yang Vacuity, Wei Qi Vacuity

Cold Winter Congee

1 oz. astragalus root
1/2 cup long-grain white rice
8 cups of water or stock
12 black dates, soaked and pitted
1 large or 2 small carrots, diced
1 T fresh ginger, minced
2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. powdered ginger
1 tsp. powdered cardamom seed

Place all the ingredients in a large pot. Bring to a boil and then simmer for 1 to 2 hours until the congee is soft and the consistency of porridge. Remove the astragalus root. This congee can be served with a dash of cinnamon and a pat of butter.

Huang Qi: strengthens Wei Qi
Rice: sweet, neutral; Supplements SP/ST, generates and preserves body fluids
Black Dates: strengthen MJ, invigorate qi
Carrot: strengthen SP/Hrt, benefit the lung, drains damp
Ginger: hot, releases exterior, harmonizes MJ
Cinnamon: releases exterior, harmonizes MJ, strengthens wei qi
Cardamom: improves circulation in digestion and LU

Egg-Drop Soup

Categories: Liver Blood Vacuity, Spleen Qi Vacuity, Wei Qi Vacuity

Egg-Drop Soup

Ingredients:

  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 medium carrot
  • 6 shiitake mushrooms
  • ½ bunch of spinach
  • 1 quart chicken broth
  • 1 Tbsp white miso
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 green onions

Instructions:

  1. Mince garlic, and chop carrot into thin coins. Remove mushroom stems, and chop caps. Wash spinach and pat dry.
  2. In a saute pan, heat olive oil over medium heat. Saute garlic for 1 minute, just long enough to become fragrant. Add carrots and mushrooms. Saute for 1-2 minutes, stirring so mushrooms don’t stick to the pan. Add spinach and a little bit of broth. Continue cooking until spinach is mostly wilted.
  3. Add the rest of the chicken broth and cover. Heat all the way through, but do not bring to a boil.
  4. Ladle out 1-2 cups of liquid into a bowl or glass container. Add miso and stir until miso is dissolved. Return to non-boiling soup, and stir to evenly distribute miso.
  5. Crack eggs, and drop them into soup, stirring to break up the whites and yolks. Cook for 1-2 minutes.
  6. Serve and garnish with green onions.

Makes 3-4 servings.

TCM analysis:

olive oil: sweet, sour, astringent, neutral; clears heat, detoxifies, promotes body fluids
garlic: acrid, hot; detoxifies meat & seafood; removes stagnant food or blood; warms yang
carrot: sweet, neutral; SP, LV, LU, HRT; strengthens SP and HRT, nourishes and soothes LV
shiitake: sweet, neutral; SP, LU; supplements qi, boosts wei qi, lowers cholesterol
spinach: sweet, cold; ST, LI; nourishes blood, stabilizes yin, moistens dryness
chicken broth: sweet, warm; SP, ST, KD; supplements qi, nourishes blood, boosts wei qi
miso: salty, cool; aids digestion, neutralizes acid in the body, increases resistance to disease
eggs: sweet, neutral; SP, ST, LU; nourishes yin & blood, supplements SP/ST, calms shen
green onions: acrid, warm; LU, LI; releases external wind-cold, invigorates blood, drains damp

In general, this recipe is neutral in temperature and sweet to tonify qi, blood, and fluids. Warm, acrid ingredients (garlic, green onions) lightly invigorate to prevent cloying, and balance other cool ingredients (spinach, miso). The recipe is directed to the middle jiao, where it strengthens SP and ST qi and promotes SP production of blood. The use of chicken broth, shiitake mushrooms, and miso also strengthens immunity by boosting protective qi.

Soba Noodles with Mustard Greens

Categories: Lung Fluid Xu, Lung Phlegm Cold, Lung Qi Vacuity, Wei Qi Vacuity

Soba Noodles with Mustard Greens
(serves 2)

½ pound soba noodles
½ pound mustard greens
3 cups chicken broth (or vegetable)
2 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp sake
1 slice fresh ginger
1 scallion, minced
¼ teaspoon pepper

1.Cook the soba noodles in boiling water until just done, about 5 minutes. Drain, rinse with cold water. Wash the mustard greens well, and cut into pieces.
2.Heat the broth, add the soy sauce, sake and ginger. Simmer 10 minutes or until the broth is flavored. Remove the ginger slice and discard. Add the mustard greens and cook until wilted and tender, about 5 minutes.
3.If adding the noodles, stir them into the broth, sprinkle with scallion and pepper, and serve. As an alternative, serve the broth in a bowl and the noodles sprinkled with scallions and pepper on the side. Dip the noodles into the broth and eat; drink the broth at the end of the meal.

Analysis:
Soba noodles are made from buckwheat, which is sweet and cool. It drains damp heat, clears heat and resolves toxicity, and alleviates wind headache. Mustard greens are acrid and warm, expel wind, cold and damp, open the chest and stop cough, and warm the LU. Chicken broth is warm and sweet, supplements qi of SP and ST, nourishes blood, boosts wei qi and consolidates the KD. Soy sauce is salty and cold, harmonizes the MJ and clears heat. Sake is warm and pungent, invigorating, and promotes circulation. Ginger is pungent and warm, disperses exterior cold, stops nausea and vomiting, detoxifies other substances, and reduces inflammation. Scallion and pepper are both pungent and warm, scallion releases exterior wind cold, invigorates blood, and drains damp; pepper warms MJ, expels cold, and invigorates blood.
Overall, the warming and acrid/pungent nature of the ingredients primarily influences the LU. They help tonify and moisten the LU and clear chest congestion. This dish has a mix of hot and cold temperature foods (but more warm), and can be used in a variety of LU conditions, including exterior invasions, flu, or bronchitis.

Cold Winter Congee

Categories: Spleen Qi Vacuity, Spleen Yang Vacuity, Wei Qi Vacuity

Cold Winter Congee

1 oz. astragalus root
1/2 cup long-grain white rice
8 cups of water or stock
12 black dates, soaked and pitted
1 large or 2 small carrots, diced
1 T fresh ginger, minced
2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. powdered ginger
1 tsp. powdered cardamom seed

Place all the ingredients in a large pot. Bring to a boil and then simmer for 1 to 2 hours until the congee is soft and the consistency of porridge. Remove the astragalus root. This congee can be served with a dash of cinnamon and a pat of butter.

Huang Qi: strengthens Wei Qi
Rice: sweet, neutral; Supplements SP/ST, generates and preserves body fluids
Black Dates: strengthen MJ, invigorate qi
Carrot: strengthen SP/Hrt, benefit the lung, drains damp
Ginger: hot, releases exterior, harmonizes MJ
Cinnamon: releases exterior, harmonizes MJ, strengthens wei qi
Cardamom: improves circulation in digestion and LU

Rice Porridge with Astragalus & Common Yam

Categories: Lung Qi Vacuity, Spleen Qi Vacuity, Wei Qi Vacuity

Rice Porridge with Astragalus & Common Yam

Boil one cup brown rice with 2 yams and 24g of Astragalus (huang qi) until they are all very soft. The final consistency should be of a thick soup, or congee. Do not eat the huang qi. Rest assured that the properties of this medicinal herb will have been transferred to the congee and absorbed by the other ingredients.

Brown Rice- Sweet, warm. Affects Spleen and Stomach. Supplements qi, Soothes Stomach, Drains Damp.
Huang qi – Sweet, Warm. Affects Spleen, lung. Tonify qi, Raise yang, Boost wei qi, Used for Wasting and thirsting, Drains damp.
Yam – Sweet, Neutral. Affects Spleen, lung, kidney. Supplements Spleen, Lung, Kidney; Benefits yin and fluids, Consolidates kidney.

Indications of Sp/St qi xu: fatigue, lassitude, abdominal bloating, loose stools, pale tongue with white coating and fine weak pulse.

All 3 ingredients benefit Spleen qi. Huang qi and brown rice drain dampness. Huang qi raises clear qi and yang. This recipe is especially helpful because it is already in a soup or congee form and this makes digestion quite easy as the Spleen and Stomach have a bit of the burden taken off them.

Chinese Duck and Shiitake Dumplings

Categories: Kidney Qi Vacuity, Lung Qi Vacuity, Lung Yin Vacuity, Wei Qi Vacuity

Chinese Duck and Shiitake Dumplings
Yields about thirty-six 3-inch dumplings.

For the dough:
6-3/4 oz. (1-1/2 cups) unbleached all-purpose flour; more for kneading

For the filling:
Half a roast duck, preferably Beijing-style
8 dried shiitake mushrooms, soaked in hot water for 30 minutes
1/2 tsp. granulated sugar
6 oz. spinach, washed and trimmed
1/4 cup finely chopped water chestnuts
2 medium scallions, thinly sliced
1-1/2 Tbs. minced fresh ginger
1 Tbs. soy sauce
1 tsp. cornstarch
Freshly ground black pepper

To finish the dumplings:
Kosher salt, as needed (for boiled dumplings)
Vegetable oil, as needed (for pan-fried dumplings)
1 recipe Ginger Vinegar or Scallion-Soy Dipping Sauce

Make the dough:
Pour the flour into a mound on a clean work surface. Make a deep, wide well in the center and pour in 1/2 cup cold water. Stir with your fingers, staying in the center at first and being careful that the water doesn’t breach the wall. Little by little, using your hand and a bench knife, mix in flour from the sides until the dough starts to come together. (Alternatively, put the flour in a medium bowl. Make a well, add the water, and stir first with a spoon and then your hand.) If the dough remains in shreds, sprinkle in additional water, a teaspoon at a time, until it begins to stick together. Don’t add too much water or the dough will be difficult to work.

Knead the dough for 5 minutes to form a smooth, firm, elastic ball. (If you began the dough in a bowl, lightly dust a clean, dry surface with flour before kneading.) The dough should not be sticky and should bounce back when pressed with a fingertip. Divide in half with a bench knife and roll into two 6-inch logs. Sprinkle each log evenly with flour, cover with a clean kitchen towel, and let rest for at least 30 minutes at room temperature before rolling and filling.

Make the filling:
Separate the duck meat from the bones and skin; shred the meat finely by hand. Cut the stems from the mushrooms and discard. Squeeze excess moisture from the caps and chop finely. Transfer the duck and mushrooms to a medium bowl.

In a 12-inch skillet, bring 2 Tbs. of water and the sugar to a boil over high heat. Add the spinach and cook, stirring, until wilted, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Squeeze the excess water from the spinach and transfer to a cutting board to cool. Chop finely.

Stir the spinach, water chestnuts, scallions, ginger, soy sauce, cornstarch, and 1/4 tsp. black pepper into the duck and mushrooms. Transfer to a bowl and let cool.
Cut and roll the dough
Cut each log in half crosswise. Cut each half crosswise into thirds, and then slice each of those pieces into three even coins. You should have 36 pieces of equal size. Toss the pieces in flour to coat evenly and then cover with a clean towel so they don’t dry out.

Using a small rolling pin, roll a piece of dough into a thin 3-inch circle; with the dough in one hand and the pin in the other, roll from the edges toward the center as you rotate the dough. This rolling technique helps create a round with thin edges and a thicker center.

Fill and shape the dumplings:

Tip: If you have helpers, set up an assembly line and roll out each wrapper, then pass it along to the next person to fill. If you’re filling all the dumplings yourself, it’s best to roll out several wrappers, and keep them covered with a kitchen towel as you fill them, to prevent them from drying out.

Spoon 1 to 2 tsp. of the filling onto a dough circle, fold it in half, and then if you’re going to boil the dumplings, seal it by pinching along the curved edge. If you’re planning to pan-fry the dumplings for pot stickers, make your first pinch at the center of the curved edge and then pleat toward the center on both sides to create a rounded belly. This wider shape allows the dumplings to sit upright in the pan and form a flat surface for browning.

Repeat with the remaining wrappers and filling. As you work, arrange the filled dumplings in a single layer without touching on large plates, so they don’t stick together.

To cook: either boil the dumplings…
Bring a large (7- to 8-quart) pot of salted water to a boil. Working in 2 or 3 batches to avoid overcrowding, quickly add the dumplings one at a time, making sure they don’t stick to each other. Lower the heat to medium and continue to boil, gently stirring occasionally, until the dumplings float and are cooked through, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and serve immediately with your choice of dipping sauce.

…or pan-fry the dumplings:
Heat 2 Tbs. vegetable oil in a heavy-duty 10- or 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Working quickly and in batches if necessary (adding more oil for the second batch if needed), arrange the dumplings belly side down in concentric circles starting from the outer edge. Cook until golden brown on the bottom, 1 to 2 minutes. Pour in about 1/2 cup water or enough to come about a third of the way up the sides of the dumplings, bring to a boil, cover, and cook until all of the water has been absorbed, 2 to 3 minutes. Remove the lid, reduce the heat to medium, and continue cooking just until the dumplings are dry and crisp on the bottom, 1 to 2 minutes. Loosen the dumplings from the pan with a spatula. Invert the pan over a plate to flip the dumplings, browned side up, onto the plate (or transfer with a spatula). Serve immediately with your choice of dipping sauce.

TCM Analysis- Overall, this recipe strongly tonifies the Lung Qi and Yin, boosts the Wei Qi, lowers cholesterol, and strengthens the Kidneys. The addition of Ginger with the duck helps to digest the recipe, because of their ability to strengthen the stomach, and prevent dampness.

Miso Soup

Categories: Wei Qi Vacuity, Wind Cold Invading Lungs, Wind Heat Invading Lungs, Wind Invasion (External)

From http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/miso-soup-recipe.html

Miso Soup Recipe

Miso Choice: This time around I used an organic white miso, but I’d encourage you to experiment with a range of misos.

3 ounces dried soba noodles
2 – 4 tablespoons miso paste (to taste)
2 – 3 ounces firm tofu (2 handfuls), chopped into 1/3-inch cubes
a handful of watercress or spinach, well washed and stems trimmed
2 green onions, tops removed thinly sliced
a small handful of cilantro
a pinch of red pepper flakes

Cook the soba noodles in salted water, drain, run cold water over the noodles to stop them from cooking, shake off any excess water and set aside.

In a medium sauce pan bring 4 cups of water to a boil. Reduce the heat to a gentle simmer and remove from heat. Pour a bit of the hot water into a small bowl and whisk in the miso paste – so it thins out a bit (this step is to avoid clumping). Stir this back into the pot. Taste, and then add more (the same way) a bit at a time until it is to your liking. Also, some miso pastes are less-salty than others, so you may need to add a bit of salt here. Add the tofu, remove from the heat, and let it sit for just a minute or so.

Split the noodles between two (or three) bowls, and pour the miso broth and tofu over them. Add some watercress, green onions, cilantro, and red pepper flakes to each bowl and enjoy.

Serves 2 – 3.

Analysis – Great for supporting LU function at onset of Wind Cold or Wind Heat – gently and lightly releases the exterior, moves qi and warms and cools simultaneously.

Ginger-Scallion-Mushroom Tea

Categories: Asian, Beverages, Gluten-free, Lung Phlegm Cold, Vegan, Vegetarian, Wei Qi Vacuity, Wind Cold Invading Lungs

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Ginger-Scallion-Mushroom Tea

Here is a variation as many people don’t know what chinese dates are or where to get them….just use mushrooms instead….almost any kind will work to boost immune system (LU/KD)

6 slices ginger
3 stalks scallions
5 pieces of sliced button or shitake mushroom

Cook ginger slices, chopped scallion and sliced mushroom pieces in 3 1/2 cups of water for about 5 minutes. Strain and drink 1 cup each time, 3x a day.  Eat the ingredients if possible but not necessary

Serves: 3

Mitchell Harris L.Ac, MSTOM said:

Ginger-Scallion-Date Tea6 slices ginger
3 stalks scallions
5 pieces of black date (da zao)
Serves: 3
Cook ginger slices, chopped scallion and sliced date pieces in 3 1/2 cups of water for about 5 minutes. Strain and drink 1 cup each time, 3x a day.