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Beet Soup

Categories: Liver Blood Stasis, Liver Blood Vacuity, Spleen Damp, Spleen Qi Vacuity

Wood - Blood Stagnation

Beet Soup

This soup can help build blood, and help your blood move freely throughout the body.  It helps break up blood stagnation.  Beets are also beneficial for the eyes. This soup can help strengthen the eyes and improve vision.  The soup is also gentle on your digestive system. It can help drain damp, and strengthen the spleen and stomach.

Ingredients

  • 5-6 carrots
  • 2-3 large beets
  • 2 onions
  • 2-4 stalks celery
  • 3-4 cloves garlic
  • 2 Tablespoon miso
  • 2 Tablespoon Olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon fresh basil, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon fresh oregano, chopped
  • 3-4 cups of water

Directions

  1. Cook vegetables with 3-4 cups of water until tender.
  2. Blend vegetables with the cooking liquid.
  3. Add the miso, olive oil, basil, oregano, and plum paste.
  4. Return to flame and simmer for 20 minutes to mix flavors. (The Tao of Nutrition page 171).

Options:  consider adding miso at the end of cooking time so that it’s beneficial organisms aren’t destroyed by heat.  To do so, put the miso in a bowl.  Add a small amount of soup to it.  Stir to make a smooth paste.  Return miso/soup paste to soup.  Stir to incorporate.

Carrots- Sweet, neutral; spleen, liver, lung heart; Strengthens spleen and liver, nourishes and soothes liver, benefits the lung, diuretic drains damp, anti-inflammatory.

Beets- neutral to cool; spleen, stomach, liver, heart; nourishes liver blood, tonify heart, calm spirit, lubricate intestines, cleanse liver, expand chest, clear heat toxin.

Onions- Pungent; lung; clears heat relieves toxicity.

Celery- Sweet, bitter, cold; liver, stomach; clears heat, tonifies kidneys, strengthens spleen/stomach, lowers blood pressure, benefits blood, calms liver and shen, promotes diuresis, drains damp transforms phlegm.

Garlic- Hot, acrid; large, intestine, lung, spleen, stomach: removes stagnate blood or food, reduces abscess, warms yang, dispels cold, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-viral, detoxifies meat and seafood, kills worms.

Miso- Salty, neutral; Spleen, stomach; promotes digestion, strengthens the stomach.

Olive oil- Sweet, cool; liver, gallbladder; moistens, benefits the liver and gallbladder.

Basil- Pungent, warm; stomach, lung; diaphoretic, harmonizes stomach, counteracts seafood poisoning.

Oregano- Pungent, bitter, neutral; heart, small intestine, lung, large intestine; drains damp, fever, vomiting, dysentery, colds, jaundice and diarrhea. It is antiseptic, antimicrobial and antiviral. It has been used to promote menstruation and as a digestive aid.

Ratatouille

Categories: Blood Stasis

Frances Norris

Blood stasis

Ratatouille - Adapted from recipe on eatyourvegetable.com

Ingredients

  • 1 eggplant, cubed into 1 inch pieces-cool, sweet, removes blood stagnation
  • 2 tomatoes, cut into eighths-slightly cool, sweet, sour, promotes fluids
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, chopped-hot, pungent, removes stagnant blood
  • 1 onion, chopped-warm, pungent
  • Olive oil-neutral, sweet, sour, astringent, promotes production of body fluids
  • Dry oregano
  • Dry basil-warm, pungent
  • Salt-cold, salty, slightly sweet, harmonizes digestion
  • Pepper-pungent, warm, warms the MJ

Directions

Preheat oven to 375

Toss vegetables, a few splashes of olive oil, and spices in a cast iron pot or any sort of roasting pan until

well-combined. Cover and bake until veggies are tender and juices are bubbling, about 45 minutes to an

hour, depending on your oven. Serve over pasta.

Lemony Quinoa with Artichokes and Sundried Tomatoes

Categories: Liver Qi Stagnation

Frances Norris

Wood-liver qi stagnation

Lemony Quinoa with Artichokes and Sundried Tomatoes - Makes 6 servings

Adapted from recipe on arootedlife.com

Ingredients

  • 2 cups uncooked quinoa-sweet, warming, tonifies qi
  • 4 cups water
  • 1 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes- slightly cool, sweet, sour, calms liver, clears heat,
  • 2 15 oz. cans of artichoke hearts, packed in water- sweet, bitter, cooling, regulates liver qi, clears liver heat, benefits the LV/GB
  • Juice of one lemon-cool, sour, regulates qi, benefits liver
  • ½ cup olive oil-neutral, sweet, sour, astringent, clears heat
  • 2 sprigs of fresh mint-cooling, moves liver qi
  • 1 handful fresh basil-pungent, warm, harmonizes stomach
  • Salt-cold, salty, slightly sweet, harmonizes digestion
  • Pepper-hot, pungent, warms digestion

Directions

1. Prepare quinoa by bringing 4 cups of salted water to boil. Add quinoa, return to a boil. Cover and reduce heat to low. Cook until all the water is absorbed. Remove from heat and allow to sit, lid on, for 5-10 minutes before fluffing with a fork.

2. While Quinoa cooks, drain and artichoke hearts. In a large bowl, whisk together olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper to make a simple dressing. Add in tomatoes and artichokes and toss.

3. Once the quinoa is ready, add it to the large bowl and mix until the artichokes and tomatoes are evenly distributed and everything is coated in the dressing. Toss in chopped mint and basil.

Quinoa with Basil and Pine Nuts

Categories: Spleen Yang Vacuity

Quinoa with Basil and Pine Nuts

Serves 2

Ingredients:
1 cup quinoa (sweet and warm, tonifies qi, strengthens spleen, warms yang, relieves internal cold)
Pinch of fine sea salt
1/2 cup pine nuts or cashews (warm and sweet, lubricates lungs, relieves cough, lubricates intestines, promotes production of body fluids)
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 generous handful fresh basil leaves, chopped (warm and pungent, induces sweating, harmonizes stomach, antidote for seafood poisoning)

Preparation:
Place the quinoa in a strainer and rinse well. Combine the quinoa with 2 cups of water and the salt in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, cover, and simmer for 20 minutes.
While the quinoa cooks, heat the pine nuts in a small dry skillet over medium heat. Toast until the nuts are just starting to turn golden, about 6-7 minutes, shaking the pan frequently to prevent burning. Transfer to a serving bowl to cool.
Add the quinoa to the serving bowl with the pine nuts and fluff with a fork. Add the olive oil and basil, stir to combine , and serve.

Overall this recipe is warming and the quinoa is great for spleen yang vacuity.

Scallion and Basil Chicken Noodle Soup

Categories: Soup, Spleen Qi Vacuity, Wei Qi Vacuity, Wind Cold Invading Lungs

_Chicken_Noodle_Soup

Scallion and Basil Chicken Noodle Soup

ingredients:
one carton organic chicken broth
one large organic boneless skinless chicken breast
one bunch scallions, whites minced fine, greens sliced and reserved for topping
one large handful fresh basil, minced
3 inch piece fresh ginger, sliced thin
1/2 package brown rice noodles

boil the chicken breast with the broth and white parts of the scallion and the ginger until it shreds easily, about 30 minutes; add the noodles and basil and cook approximately 6 minutes longer. serve topped with the green parts of the scallion. salt to taste.

serves 2-3.

TCM ANALYSIS
chicken is warm and sweet, tonifies qi, strengthens KD/SP. basil, scallions and ginger are warm and pungent, release the exterior, and transform phlegm from cold. brown rice is sweet, sour, and warm and strengthens the SP and drains dampness.

feel good soup for a rainy day. add a cinnamon stick in with the broth at the beginning for extra achy body.

Basil Plants Have Anti-Arthritic Properties

Categories: Articles, Nutritional Information, Western Medicine

Basil Plants Have Anti-Arthritic Properties
Main Category: Complementary Medicine / Alternative Medicine
Also Included In: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Article Date: 07 Sep 2009 – 5:00 PDT

Two varieties of Basil that are widely used in Ayurvedic medicine have been scientifically shown to reduce inflammation and swelling, suggesting that they could have potential in arthritis treatment.

At the Royal Pharmaceutical Society’s annual event, the British Pharmaceutical Conference in Manchester, Mr Vaibhav Shinde from Poona Collage of Pharmacy, Pune, India, presented results of studies on the varieties Ocimum tenuiflorum Linn and Ocimum americanum Linn, which are used in Ayurvedic treatment of bronchitis, bronchial asthma, skin diseases, arthritis, inflammation and fever.

Extracts of O. tenuiflorum were shown to reduce swelling by up to 73%, 24 hours after treatment, and similar results were seen with O. americanum. Results for both plants were similar to those seen with diclofenac – an anti-inflammatory drug that is widely used in the treatment of arthritis.

“Our results supported the use of these traditional treatments in inflammatory conditions, such as arthritis, and we will now carry out more detailed evaluation of the plants for active compounds which could be developed into new medicines,” said Mr Shinde.

Results of the current study add to previous research supporting the medicinal properties of Basil plants1.

References

1 Prakash P, Gupta N. Therapeutic uses of Ocimum sanctum Linn (Tulsi) with a note on eugenol and its pharmacological actions: a short review. Indian Journal Physiol. Pharmacol 2005; 49: 125-131

About Ayurvedic medicine

Ayurvedic medicine originated in India over 2000 years ago and is widely practised in India and SE Asia. It aims to balance body, mind and spirit to help prevent illness and promote wellness. It uses a variety of products, including herbs, proteins, minerals and vitamins, and techniques, such as massage, exercise and meditation, to cleanse the body and restore balance.

Source
The Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/163158.php

PESTOS NOT JUST FOR PASTA – HOW TO GET SOME GREENS INTO YOUR DIET – RECIPE

Categories: Articles, Cooking tips

Recipes for Health
Pestos: Not Just for Pasta
By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN

August 31, 2009

Pesto once meant one thing to me: pesto Genovese, the famous and fabulous basil paste from the Italian Riviera. It was such a revelation the first time I tasted it. When cooks in this country caught on, pesto Genovese became so ubiquitous that now it’s hard to find a sandwich that hasn’t been slathered with it.

Pesto Genovese is made by grinding pine nuts, garlic and basil to a paste, which is then enriched with olive oil and Parmesan (or a combination of Pecorino and Parmesan). It’s traditionally used as a pasta sauce, and I think that’s the best place for pesto Genovese.

But there are sauces made with copious amounts of other herbs or greens not destined for pasta. They aren’t called pestos, yet that’s what they are. All made by grinding herbs and other ingredients to a paste, then thinning out and enriching with oil. If you are looking for ways to get more healthy green herbs into your diet, you can’t do better than these sauces. None of them requires pasta or bread to enjoy.

The Tunisians make a wonderful sauce using cilantro, parsley and spices called chermoula, which is traditionally served with fish. Another cilantro sauce is a signature dish of the Republic of Georgia, this one a beguiling mixture of ground walnuts, dried apricots (in the form of apricot leather), garlic, cilantro, parsley and other herbs, and walnut oil. It’s served with chicken, meats, fish and vegetables, and stirred into cooked red beans. In Apulia and the Abruzzo in southern Italy, I found a delicious pesto made with arugula, served with pasta and stirred into a barley risotto. I use it to fill tomatoes, which I then roast.

Each of these sauces has its own distinctive flavor, but they have one thing in common (besides a certain addictiveness): they’re all pungent with garlic.

Arugula Pesto

In addition to serving this vibrant pesto with pasta, I use it with grains (risottos made with rice, barley, or wheat) and as a topping for tomatoes. It’s great on its own, spooned onto a thick slice of country bread. Don’t use a sharp olive oil with this, or it will overwhelm the arugula.

2 garlic cloves, cut in half, green shoots removed

2 heaped tablespoons shelled walnuts

4 ounces arugula, stemmed, washed and dried (2 cups leaves, tightly packed)

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/3 to 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil, as needed

1/3 to 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan, to taste

1. Turn on a food processor fitted with the steel blade, and drop in the garlic cloves. When they are chopped and adhering to the sides, stop the machine, scrape down the sides of the bowl and add the walnuts. Turn on the machine, and process until they are finely ground. Scrape down the bowl again, and add the arugula and the salt. Pulse until the arugula is finely chopped, then turn on the machine and run while you slowly drizzle in the olive oil. When the mixture is smooth, stop the machine, scrape down the sides and process for another 30 seconds or so. Scrape out into the bowl of a mortar and pestle. Grind the mixture with the pestle for a smoother texture. Work in the cheese and combine well.

Yield: Makes about 2/3 cup.

Advance preparation: Cover the top with a film of olive oil, and this will keep in the refrigerator for a couple of days.

Martha Rose Shulman can be reached at martha-rose-shulman.com.

Copyright 2009 The New York Times Company