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Honey Glazed Peach Tart

Categories: Lung Fluid Xu, Lung Yin Vacuity, Shen Calming

Honey Glazed Peach Tart

Crust ( you can use pre-made pie dough from the grocery store)

* 1 1/2 cups all purpose flour (clears heat)
* 3 tablespoons powdered sugar (tonifies Mother of LU)
* 1/4 teaspoon salt
* 1/2 cup (1 stick) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes (moistens dryness)
* 3 1/2 tablespoons (about) ice water

Filling

* 1/4 cup sugar
* 3 tablespoons all purpose flour (clears heat)
* 2 teaspoons grated lemon peel (regulates qi)
* 6 ripe medium peaches, peeled, halved, pitted, cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices (about 4 cups) (lubricates lungs, astringes LU Qi, clears heat)
* 2 tablespoons honey (moistens lungs)
* 2 tablespoons chilled unsalted butter, cut into small pieces (Lubricates dryness)
* 2 tablespoons sliced almonds (ventilates lungs, relieves cough)
* 2 tablespoons peach preserves, melted (same as peaches)

For crust:
Blend flour, sugar, and salt in processor. Using on/off turns, cut in butter until pea-size pieces form. With machine running, add enough ice water by tablespoonfuls to form moist clumps. Gather dough into ball; flatten into disk. Wrap in plastic; refrigerate 1 hour.

Roll out dough on lightly floured surface to 12-inch round. Transfer to 9-inch-diameter tart pan with removable bottom. Trim overhang to 1 inch. Fold overhang in and press to form double-thick sides. Press inside edge of crust to push it 1/8 to 1/4 inch above top edge of pan. Pierce bottom of crust with fork. Refrigerate 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 400° F. Bake tart crust until golden, piercing with fork if bubbles form, about 25 minutes. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cool; wrap in plastic and store at room temperature.)

For filling:
Mix sugar, flour, and lemon peel in large bowl to blend. Add peaches and toss to coat. Pour into baked crust. Drizzle honey over peach mixture; dot with butter and sprinkle with almonds. Bake until peaches are tender and almonds are toasted, about 35 minutes. Brush fruit and almonds with peach preserves. Cool 15 minutes before serving. (Can be made 6 hours ahead. Store tart at room temperature.)

Serves 6

 

CI: mind patients who have  propensity for phlegm and dampness

Harvest Pumpkin Soup

Categories: Spleen Qi Vacuity, Spleen Yang Vacuity, Stomach Cold

Earth-spleen qi/yang xu

Frances Norris

Harvest Pumpkin Soup

Martha Stewart

Ingredients

1 small pumpkin, halved, seeds and stringy fibers put aside-cool, sweet, dispels damp

6 tbsp. unsalted butter- sweet, neutral, supplements qi

3 cups chicken stock-sweet, warm, supplements qi

3 cups water

1 sprig fresh thyme

1 small parsnip, peeled and coarsely chopped-warm, pungent, dispels dampness

1 small Yukon gold potato, peeled and coarsely chopped-cool, sweet, strengthens SP, harmonizes ST

2 small shallots, minced-warm, pungent

½ cup dry white wine-pungent, sweet, warm, expels cold

3 tbsp. heavy cream-sweet, neutral, supplements qi

1 tsp. packed light-brown sugar-sweet, warm, supplements MJ

2 tsp. coarse salt-salty, cold, nourishes KD

Freshly ground pepper to taste-pungent, warm, warms the MJ, expels damp and cold

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 400, place pumpkin halves, cut sides down, on a rimmed baking sheet. Bake until soft, about 50 min. Scoop out flesh, and puree in a food processor.

2. Melt 1 tbsp. butter in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Add reserved seeds and fibers from pumpkin, and cook for 4 min. Add stock, water, and thyme, and bring to a gentle simmer.

Cook for 9 to 10 min.

3. Meanwhile, melt remaining 5 tbsp. butter in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add pumpkin puree, parsnip, potato, and turnip, and cook for 5 min. Add shallots, and cook until soft, about 4 min. Add wine, and cook until liquid has reduced by half.

4. Strain pumpkin-seed mixture, reserving broth and discarding solids. Add broth to pumpkin-wine mixture. Bring to a simmer; cook 20 minutes. Let cool.

5. Puree in a food processor in small batches until smooth. Heat soup in a saucepan over medium-
high heat. Stir in cream, sugar, salt, and pepper, and serve.

Sauteed Asian Pears with Citrus Zest

Categories: Lung Fluid Xu, Lung Yin Vacuity

Sautéed Asian Pears With Citrus Zest

*2 Asian Pears
*1 TBS Butter
*2 TBS Brown Sugar
*1 TSP Orange Rind
*1 TBS Orange Juice

Preparation:
Peel, core, and slice 2 Asian pears (or other variety). Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a saucepan. Add 2 tablespoons brown sugar, stirring until melted. Add pear, 1 teaspoon grated orange rind, and 1 tablespoon fresh orange juice; cook 5 minutes or until pear is slightly tender. Remove from pan with a slotted spoon; divide among 4 plates. Allow pan juices to thicken; drizzle over pear.
Health, DECEMBER 2004

Pear: sweet, cold, Nourishes Fluids, Moistens LU, Clears Heat
Butter: neutral, sweet, Supplements Blood & Qi
Brown Sugar: sweet, warm, Supplements MJ, Descends ST qi
Orange Rind: acrid, bitter, Regulates Qi, Dries Damp
Orange Juice: sweet, sour, cool, Nourishes Fluids

This recipes moistens dryness in the LU, supplements qi as well as moving a little qi for balance.

Honey Glazed Peach Tart

Categories: Large Intestine Fluid Vacuity, Lung Fluid Xu, Lung Yin Vacuity, Shen Calming

Honey Glazed Peach Tart

Crust ( you can use pre-made pie dough from the grocery store)

* 1 1/2 cups all purpose flour (clears heat)
* 3 tablespoons powdered sugar (tonifies Mother of LU)
* 1/4 teaspoon salt
* 1/2 cup (1 stick) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes (moistens dryness)
* 3 1/2 tablespoons (about) ice water

Filling

* 1/4 cup sugar
* 3 tablespoons all purpose flour (clears heat)
* 2 teaspoons grated lemon peel (regulates qi)
* 6 ripe medium peaches, peeled, halved, pitted, cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices (about 4 cups) (lubricates lungs, astringes LU Qi, clears heat)
* 2 tablespoons honey (moistens lungs)
* 2 tablespoons chilled unsalted butter, cut into small pieces (Lubricates dryness)
* 2 tablespoons sliced almonds (ventilates lungs, relieves cough)
* 2 tablespoons peach preserves, melted (same as peaches)

For crust:
Blend flour, sugar, and salt in processor. Using on/off turns, cut in butter until pea-size pieces form. With machine running, add enough ice water by tablespoonfuls to form moist clumps. Gather dough into ball; flatten into disk. Wrap in plastic; refrigerate 1 hour.

Roll out dough on lightly floured surface to 12-inch round. Transfer to 9-inch-diameter tart pan with removable bottom. Trim overhang to 1 inch. Fold overhang in and press to form double-thick sides. Press inside edge of crust to push it 1/8 to 1/4 inch above top edge of pan. Pierce bottom of crust with fork. Refrigerate 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 400°F. Bake tart crust until golden, piercing with fork if bubbles form, about 25 minutes. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cool; wrap in plastic and store at room temperature.)

For filling:
Mix sugar, flour, and lemon peel in large bowl to blend. Add peaches and toss to coat. Pour into baked crust. Drizzle honey over peach mixture; dot with butter and sprinkle with almonds. Bake until peaches are tender and almonds are toasted, about 35 minutes. Brush fruit and almonds with peach preserves. Cool 15 minutes before serving. (Can be made 6 hours ahead. Store tart at room temperature.)

Serves 6

CI: Spleen Qi Deficiency leading to Damp/Phlegm

Jumbo Shrimp with Chive Butter

Categories: Kidney Yang Vacuity

Kidney Yang Xu
JUMBO SHRIMP WITH CHIVE BUTTER

Ingredients
1/4 cup Dijon mustard
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1 cup (2 sticks) butter, melted
6 tablespoons chopped fresh chives
36 uncooked jumbo shrimp, peeled, deveined, butterflied
Whole chives

Preparation
Preheat broiler. Place mustard in bowl; whisk in lemon juice, then melted butter. Add chopped chives. Season with pepper.
Arrange shrimp, cut side up, on broiler pan. Brush with some of butter mixture. Broil until just cooked through, about 4 minutes. Arrange on plates and garnish with whole chives. Serve, passing remaining butter separately.

Ingredients analysis
Dijon mustard — Acrid, warm; Lung; Warms the Lungs, regulates qi, and expels phlegm; Promotes movement of the qi, disperses clumps, unblocks the collaterals and stops pain.
Lemon juice – cool, sour; Lv; Generates fluids, harmonizes St, regulates qi, quenches thirst, benefits Lv.
Butter – Sweet, neutral; Sp, St, Lu; Supplements qi, nourishes blood, moistens dryness.
Chives — Sweet, acrid, warm; St, Lv, Kd; Warms the middle jiao, warms the Kd yang, invigorates blood
Shrimp — Sweet, warm; Lv, Kd, Sp; Boosts Kd yang, promotes lactation, discharges pus and mucus

TCM analysis: Overall this recipe is warm and sweet. The main ingredients in the recipe tonify Kd yang while the other ingredients regulate, tonify qi, and harmonize and warm the middle jiao.

Beet-Walnut Salad

Categories: Large Intestine Fluid Vacuity, Liver Blood Stasis, Liver Blood Vacuity

Beet-Walnut Salad
Overall Recipe: Nourishes heart blood, moves blood to build blood, moistens intestines

Beets: sweet, neutral. Nourishes heart blood, moves blood, regulates menstruation, moistens intestines.
Onions: acrid, warm. Warms interior, moves qi and blood.
Butter: sweet, neutral. Tonifies deficiency, engenders fluids, moistens intestines.
Walnuts: sweet, warm. Supplements kidneys, moistens intestines.
Mustard: acrid, warm. Releases exterior, courses qi.
Vinegar: sour, bitter warm. Scatters stasis, stops bleeding.
Spinach: sweet, cool. Nourishes blood, stops bleeding, moistens dryness.

Emily Hildebrand said:

Beet-Walnut Salad
Serves 4-62 onions, sliced
1 Tbsp butter or olive oil
6 beets
1/2 cup walnuts
2 Tbsp raw apple cider vinegar
1 tsp dijon mustard
a healthy drizzle of olive oil
salt and pepper to taste
Arugula or spinach

Roast beets, whole and unpeeled in a 400 degree oven for 1 hour, until fork tender. Set aside and let cool. Meanwhile, caramelize the onions in the butter/oil over low heat until golden brown. Peel, and chop the beets, mix in with caramelized onions and walnuts. Whisk together the vinegar, mustard and oil and pour over the salad. Serve over arugula, spinach or alone.

Strawberry butter

Categories: Appetizers, Lung Yin Vacuity, Snacks, Vegetarian

strawberry

Strawberry Butter

1/2 cup butter, softened
2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon strawberry preserves

Mix together in a bowl well put on a lid to be refrigerated for later use.

This meal is for a Lung Yin xu Pattern with Stagnant Blood

butter- Disperses Stagnant Blood

honey- Tonifies Yin
strawberry-  Lubricates Lungs, Tonifies Yin

 

What are the advantages and disadvantages of butter and ghee when it comes to cooking?

Categories: Articles, Cooking tips, Food Education, Western Medicine

From a nutritional standpoint, both butter and ghee are basically made from the fats of whole milk. Although butter in the United States is almost always made from cow’s milk, the ghee used for cooking in India is often made from buffalo milk. Both ghee and butter are usually 80% milk fat or greater in terms of their composition, and about two-thirds of that fat is saturated fat.

How Butter Is Made

Butter is made by separating cream from milk. Since the fat-based cream portion of the milk is lighter than the water and milk solids portion, the cream in fresh milk will eventually rise to the top of the milk over time if the milk is simply left standing. However, a centrifuge that very forcefully spins can be used to speed up this process. (When milk is centrifuged, the lighter cream will stay closer to the center and the heavier water and solid portions will fly to the outside of the centrifuge.) When cream has been separated from milk, it can be churned until it reaches a semi-solid state. That product is what we call butter.

Clarified Butter and Ghee

Clarified butter is butter that has been melted over low heat and allowed to bubble and simmer until most of the water has been evaporated. Clarified butter is also sometimes called drawn butter. Ghee is essentially clarified butter, although traditional ghee-making processes (originating in India, where ghee is very commonly used in cooking) place a focus on exact steps and specific qualities of the clarified butter. The cooking process is usually extended for a longer period of time with ghee, eliminating more of the moisture and also causing the milk solids to caramelize for eventual removal from the ghee through strainers. The highest-quality ghee is obtained when the long-simmered butter is allowed to cool and only the top-most layer is skimmed off. (That layer becomes the ghee that is considered top-quality and used in cooking.)

Health Consequences of Ghee and Butter

Research on ghee and health is limited, but fairly consistent. When ghee is consumed at levels above 10% total calories, it can increase risk of cardiovascular disease. (For a person consuming 1,800 calories per day, 10% of those calories would be 180 calories, or about 20 grams of fat, which equals approximately 2 tablespoons of ghee.) At levels under 10% of total calories, however, ghee appears to help lower cardiovascular risks, especially when other fats consumed during the day are exclusively from plants or plant oils.

Butter, like ghee, can increase risk of cardiovascular disease when consumed in excessive amounts. One research study has shown that 3 tablespoons of butter per day over 4 weeks can increase total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol. For this reason, if you are going to cook with butter, you will want to keep the amount at a moderate level of no more than 1-2 tablespoons.

The benefits of butter at moderate levels do not yet have the same level of research backing as ghee. However, there is increasing research interest in butter as having some unique potential benefits of its own, particularly in relationship to its vitamin K and vitamin D content. This content may vary, however, depending on the diet and living circumstances of the dairy cow. (We look forward to new research in this area, especially with respect to vitamin K2.)

Types of Fats in Ghee and Butter

When comparing ghee to butter in terms of health, one reason for the more favorable past research record of ghee versus butter might be the increased amount of medium- and short-chain fatty acids in ghee. Butter contains about 12-15% of these medium-chain and short-chain fats, whereas ghee contains about 25%. (Our bodies metabolize medium-chain and short-chain fats differently than long-chain ones, and medium- and short-chain ones are not associated with cardiovascular problems in the same way as the long-chain ones are.)

Ghee Has a Higher Smoke Point than Butter

Ghee tends to have a higher smoke point than butter. For butter, smoke point is typically reached between 325-375 F (163-191 C). Some clarified butters also fall into this general range, but ghee usually has a higher smoke point, between 400-500 F (204-260 C). This higher smoke point can be an advantage when cooking at high heat since smoke point is that moment when heat damage to some of the components in a fat or oil is sufficient to become visible in the form of smoke. When it comes to our health, heating above smoke point is not a good idea with any oil or fat.

Cooking Recommendations

For persons choosing to cook in fat at higher heats in the 400-500 F (204-260 C) range, ghee makes sense to us, provided that it’s used in moderation (no more than 1-2 tablespoons per day). Even for a person deciding to cook in fat, however, the use of butter at higher heats does not make sense to us due to its lower smoke point (325-375 F/163-191 C).

The use of butter and ghee at lower heats (300-375 F/163-191 C) may be acceptable, provided once again that both of these animal fats are used in moderation. Whether there are distinct advantages to the use of butter at lower heats versus plant oils is not clear to us from the existing research. In general, however, we do not like the idea of heating plant oils due to the delicate nature of their polyunsaturated fats and phytonutrients. Since butter has far fewer polyunsaturates than plant oils, it might provide a lower heat cooking alternative for this reason. However, the phytonutrient and vitamin content of butter would still be susceptible to heat damage, and since we have not yet seen research to confirm the health benefits of butter in lower heat cooking, we cannot recommend this practice without the benefit of more research. On our website, we offer a method of healthy sauteing that requires no fat or oil of any kind. You can visit the Cooking Healthy section of our website to learn more about this method.

References

  • Gupta R, Prakash H. Association of dietary ghee intake with coronary heart disease and risk factor prevalence in rural males. J Indian Med Assoc 1997;95(3):67-9, 83. 1997.
  • Kumar MV, Sambaiah K, Lokesh BR. Effect of dietary ghee–the anhydrous milk fat, on blood and liver lipids in rats. J Nutr Biochem 1999;10(2):96-104. 1999.
  • Kumar MV, Sambaiah K, Lokesh BR. Hypocholesterolemic effect of anhydrous milk fat ghee is mediated by increasing the secretion of biliary lipids. J Nutr Biochem 2000;11(2):69-75. 2000.
  • Nestel PJ, Chronopulos A, Cehun M. Dairy fat in cheese raises LDL cholesterol less than that in butter in mildly hypercholesterolaemic subjects. Eur J Clin Nutr 2005 Sep;59(9):1059-63. 2005.
  • Niranjan TG, Krishnakantha TP. Effect of dietary ghee–the anhydrous milk fat on lymphocytes in rats. Mol Cell Biochem 2001;226(1-2):39-47. 2001.
  • Prattala RS, Groth MV, Oltersdorf US, et al. Use of butter and cheese in 10 European countries: a case of contrasting educational differences. Eur J Public Health 2003 Jun;13(2):124-32. 2003.
  • Shankar SR, Bijlani RL, Baveja T, et al. Effect of partial replacement of visible fat by ghee (clarified butter) on serum lipid profile. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol 2002;46(3):355-60. 2002.
  • Shankar SR, Yadav RK, Ray RB, et al. Serum lipid response to introducing ghee as a partial replacement for mustard oil in the diet of healthy young Indians. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol 2005 Jan;49(1):49-56. 2005.
  • Singh RB, Niaz MA, Ghosh S, et al. Association of trans fatty acids (vegetable ghee) and clarified butter (Indian ghee) intake with higher risk of coronary artery disease in rural and urban populations with low fat consumption. Int J Cardiol 1996 Oct 25;56(3):289-98; discussion 299-300. 1996.
  • Trevisan M, Krogh V, Freudenheim J, et al. Consumption of olive oil, butter, and vegetable oils and coronary heart disease risk factors. The Research Group ATS-RF2 of the Italian National Research Council. JAMA 1990, Vol. 263 No. 5: 688 – 692. 1990.
  • Yellowlees WW. Milk, butter, and heart disease. Lancet 1991 Apr 27;337(8748):1041-2. 1991.
  • Zock PL, Katan MB. Butter, margarine and serum lipoproteins. Atherosclerosis 1997 May;131(1):7-16. 1997.

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Indian Cooking; Nutrition Info

Categories: Articles, Asian, Cooking tips, Food Culture, Indian, Nutritional Information, Western Medicine

This is not how I normally like to look at food, through caloric and fat content counting, but it is useful info to look over to get an idea of what you are putting in your body. I eat mostly vegetarian (flexitarian really) and just a friend just moved to the Devon area. This is THE Indian and Pakistani area of Chicago and so I have been eating rich, delicious vegetarian Indian food just about every night. I hope to cook some tasty, nutritious meals in this style soon. Until there here are a few ideas and tips for those who want to explore this “other” Eastern Culture’s food. It is a deep well to explore. Good Indian is some of the most rich and delicious of meals, maybe because of Yin nourishing aspect and fat content. I don’t know about some of the claims below, but worth noting. Feel free to comment. ~ Enjoy

 

Mitch

_____________

Nutrition data (calories, carbohydrates, protein) of homemade Indian food are given. Also the ways to preserve nutrition in Indian cooking are discussed.

Many Indian are vegetarians and they eat vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and plant-based proteins. These foods contain essential micro-nutrients and vitamins that produce antioxidants which are good for heart, blood pressure and diabetes.

But Indians, in general, consume less amount of vegetables {says who?}. Also reheating of vegetarian dishes, a common practice among Indians, destroys the micro-nutrients. “Indians, therefore, face heart attacks five years earlier than people in the West,” according to Dr Deepak Natarajan of Apollo hospital, Delhi.

Diets rich in saturated fats and hypertension are the main reason for this.

Indian Cooking & Nutrition

http://www.fatfreekitchen.com/nutrition/indian-foods.html

By 2010, India will carry 60 percent of the world’s heart disease burden, nearly four times more than its share of the global population, according to a study released by Denis Xavier of St. John’s National Academy of Health Sciences in Bangalore in April 2008.

  • Calories in Indian foods and their nutrition depend on the way the foods are cooked.
  • An Indian dish may be very high in calories/energy (mostly from fat) if it is cooked by deep frying, or it may be low in calories or fat if it is stir fried or baked.
  • The rich creamy dishes containing foods covered with lot of spice colored liquid are often very high in fat (mostly saturated fat and trans-fat), while the tandoori dishes are low in fat.

    The research (Feb 2010) conducted by “Which” magazine of Britain found that a single meal of Indian curry in Britain has more fat than the recommendation for the entire day, an average takeaway contained 23.2gm of saturated fat, 3.2gm more than a woman should eat in a day.  Indian takeaway meals are known for their liberal use of ghee and oil, not only in curries but also breads. The researchers found that a naan contained more calories than a chicken tikka masala.

  • Indian often reheat the food, the reheating destroys the nutrients of the food.
  • Indian food is often overcooked, destroying its nutrition.
  • The North Indian dishes are very rich in taste and presentation as compared to South Indian food. The North Indian foods, especially Punjabi foods, are generally higher in calories and fat and lower in nutritional value, than South Indian foods because Punjabi cooking involves tarka or vaghar (frying of spices, onions, etc.) in pure ghee (high in
    saturated fat), butter, oil or trans fats or trans-fatty acids (hydrogenated oils and fats, dalda) that gives unique Indian taste and texture. Read more on trans fats in Indian foods.
  • The tandoori foods of North India are rich in nutrition and natural flavours, but often these are loaded with fats. A new research reported at a conference on “Fats and trans-fatty acids in Indian diet” at the Seventh Health Writers Workshop organised by Health Essayists and Authors League (HEAL) in 2007 found that the trans-fatty acids in French fries is 4.2% – 6.1%, it is 9.5% in bhatura, 7.8% in paratha and 7.6% each in puri and tikkis.

How to Preserve Nutrition in Indian Cooking?

The health benefits of the Indian food depend on the method of cooking.

  1. If a recipe calls for too much cream, yogurt, ghee or oil and crushed cashews, then the dish will be very rich in taste and texture, but with out any nutritional value. The north Indian food, Punjabi food and the foods available in restaurants are cooked (rather over-cooked) like this and they are higher in fat and lower in nutritional value. These foods are generally prepared with deep frying onions, ginger, and spices in lot of oil or ghee. Read more on Indian
    food nutrition and calories
    .
  2. Instead of deep frying, you can stir-fry or saute them in very little vegetable oil. The over-cooked foods lose their nutrition because, in the process, the vitamins and minerals are leached out. You should leave the cooking of a vegetable when it is still crisp.
  3. Never use trans-fat or vanaspati like dalda, rath, etcfor cooking, these are not healthy. Many restaurants and shops use trans-fats for cooking tikkis, bhaturas, parathas, puri (poori) and even sweets and vegetable curries
  4. Do not chop the vegetbles into too small pieces. The vegetable will lose its nutrients if it has more exposed surfaces to the atmosphere.
  5. Always chop the vegetables only when you cook them, do not chop and leave them for a long time.
  6. Do not wash the vegetables like spinach, zucchini, lauki, etc. after chopping to preserve their nutrients.
  7. When you stir-fry, do not overheat the oil.
  8. If you make pakoras, keep the besan batter thick. Deep frying of thin batter pakoras absorb too much oil during frying.
  9. Do not add ghee or oil for making the dough of poori, otherwise the pooris will absorb too much oil during frying.

However, it is possible to have traditional Indian cooking recipes that produce tasty dishes with very less fat and keeping the natural nutrition values and low calories.