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Chai

Categories: Asian, Beverages, Qi Stagnation, Spleen Damp Cold, Spleen Qi Vacuity, Spleen Yang Vacuity, Stomach Cold, Vegetarian

chai-tea

CHAI TEA

makes 2 quarts

Ingredients:

2 qts water

2 cinnamon sticks

¼ c green cardamom pods

1 heaping tsp black peppercorns

½ heaping tsp whole cloves

Several slices of fresh ginger

1-2 black teabags (I like Darjeeling or Earl Gray)

Honey

Goat’s Milk

nutmeg

1) Combine all ingredients except for the tea bags; bring to boil, reduce heat, and simmer, covered, for 45 min.  Add the tea bags and continue to simmer for another 10-15 min.  Strain into a container to store.

2) To serve, reheat a desired amount and add honey and goat’s milk to taste; grate nutmeg over the top.

Variations:

Experiment by adding other dried herbs like dried tangerine peel or dried coconut.

You can substitute soy milk, rice milk, or almond milk for the goat’s milk.

TCM ANALYSIS

Qi Stagnation with Cold in the Middle Jiao

Cinnamon:  Hot, acrid, and sweet; HT, LV, KD, SP; strengthens stomach, warms body.

Cardamom:  Warm, acrid; KD, SP; aids digestion, warms and resolves dampness, regulates Qi, stops

nausea and vomiting.

Black Peppercorns:  Hot, acrid; ST, LI; warms body, aids digestion

Cloves:  Warm, acrid; KD, SP, ST; warms body, reverses rebellious Qi.

Ginger:  Warm, acrid; LU, SP, ST; releases exterior Wind Cold, stops nausea/vomiting

Black Tea:  Cool, bitter, sweet; clears the head, resolves phlegm, promotes digestion and urination

Honey:  Warm, sweet; LU, SP, ST; lubricates dryness, strengthens digestion

Goat’s Milk:  Neutral, sweet; strengthens, nourishes Qi and Blood, lubricates dryness

This recipe contains very warming and moving herbs that promote good digestion.  Goat’s Milk is

the traditional ingredient in this drink and even though it can be considered an acquired taste, in a

small amount, it works to tonify Qi and Blood.   Goat’s Milk is also much easier to digest than Cow’s

milk.  It can be used for indigestion, fatigue after meals, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Barley tea

Categories: Beverages, Japanese, Spleen Damp Heat, Spleen Qi Vacuity, Summerheat, Vegan, Vegetarian

mugicha2

Mugicha (Barley Tea)

Made of whole grains of roasted barley, mugicha is drunk cold in the summer and after strenuous workouts.

Add ½ – 1 cup mugicha to 8 ¾ cups of boiling water. Bring back to a boil and then simmer for 5-10 minutes. Strain discarding the barley, transfer the mugicha to a pitcher and chill. Mugicha is also available in teabags.

TCM ANALYSIS

Barley and Barley Tea: sweet sl. salty cool SP ST UB
Actions: strengthens SP and ST; supplements qi; leaches damp and promotes urination.
Indications: bloating, gas, poor appetite, loose stool, edema, painful urination, fever with thirst, Summerheat, SP deficiency with Damp Heat.

Road Rage Release Tea

Categories: Beverages, Dryness, Liver Fire Rising, Liver Yang Rising

which-tea-should-you-drink-with-your-meal1

Road Rage Release Tea

sang ye (Mulberry Leaf) 15g
ju hua (Chrysanthemum Flower) 15g
jue ming zi (Cassia Seed) 15g
ku ding (Broadleaf Holly Leaf) 15g
bo he (Peppermint Leaf) 15g

Can be combined together as a group using 5g portions or mix and match to taste.
Steep in teapot for 20 minutes. Transfer to thermos. You are ready to drive in Chicago.

Indications: Red eyes, vertigo, dizziness, vexation, irritability, HBP.
ju hua – acrid, sweet, bitter, slightly cold. Affects liver, lung. Disperses wind and clears heat; Benefits and soothes Liver, Brightens eyes.
jue ming zi – sweet, bitter, slightly cold. Liver large Intestine. Clears heat from liver, brightens eyes, reduces hypertention.
ku ding – bitter, neutral, alkaline. Liver, Stomach. Lowers hypertension, clears heat.
sang ye- bitter, sweet, cold. Lung, Liver. Disperses wind, clears heat. Clears Liver, brightens eyes. Descends lIver yang
bo he- acrid, cool. Lung, Liver. Clears head and eyes, Spreads constrained Liver qi, disperses wind heat, vents rashes, benefits throat.

One can play around with these herbs to adjust to the main concern. If it’s HPN, focus on using ku ding and jue ming zi. If stress and irritability predominate use bo he and ju hua. If dizziness and vertigo predominate use sang ye. All of the above are suitable for dry and irritated eyes.

What do you think about cooking vegetables in a microwave?

Categories: Articles, Cooking tips, Food Safety, Vegetables, Vegetarian

For The Vegetarians: Red Curry Kohlrabi

For The Vegetarians: Red Curry KohlrabiHealthy Food Tip

What do you think about cooking vegetables in a microwave?

We get many questions about whether we recommend cooking vegetables in a microwave. As you will see throughout our website, light steaming is our cooking method of choice for most vegetables. Loss of nutrients in the microwave depends on the same factors involved with loss of nutrients on the stovetop.

To predict the nutrient loss, it’s important to know answers to questions like: “Is the vegetable placed in water? How much water? To what temperature are the vegetable and water heated? For how long? We’ve seen studies showing minimal loss of nutrients from microwaved vegetables, and we’ve also seen studies showing substantial loss. In general, we prefer stovetop steaming that can be accomplished in as little time as microwaving while providing a more even heat.

http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=newtip&dbid=38&utm_source=daily_click&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_email

Are the carbs in vegetables the same cooked or uncooked?

Carbs (carbohydrates) in vegetables can definitely be affected by cooking. They are not affected as quickly or as extensively as phytonutrients like flavonoids or carotenoids, but they are still subject to changes from baking, boiling, steaming, and roasting. The exact impact of cooking on vegetables-and on other foods as well -depends on how long you cook them, how high a temperature you cook them at, and how much moisture you use when cooking them. But here are some basics about vegetables, cooking, and carbs that you should know.

Conversion of starch to sugar

Heat can help increase the rate at which vegetable starches get converted into vegetable sugars. A baked Russet potato, for example, will lose about 10% of its raw-form total starch content and convert that starch content into sugar. From a nutritional perspective, this loss of starch and increase in sugar is relatively small and not typically a cause for great concern. However, the baking of a starchy vegetable can also raise its glycemic index (GI) value. This increase in GI (often related to the conversion of starches to sugars) holds true for vegetables like potatoes, sweet potatoes, yams, plaintains, and carrots. A raw carrot typically has a GI value in the 15-20 range. A cooked carrot’s GI will typically fall into the 35-50 range. (You can find a reliable list of GI values in the website established by David Mendosa and based on research at the University of Sydney in Australia at http://www.mendosa.com/gilists.htm.)

Changes in resistant starch

Research studies show definite changes in levels of resistant starch naturally occurring in vegetables (and other foods). Resistant starches are generally viewed as helpful carbohydrates that resist breakdown in the digestive tract long enough to reach the large intestine and support the metabolic needs of helpful bacteria and cells lining the large intestine. However, the precise relationship between vegetable cooking and resistant starch is not yet clear. In some cases, the cooking of vegetables has presented some very favorable results with respect to the amount of available resistant starches. In other cases, no change in resistant starch levels has been determined to result from cooking. While the jury is still out in this area of research, look for future studies about the impact of cooking on the levels of resistant starch in vegetables and other foods.

Dry versus liquid heat

When vegetables are boiled in water, some of their sugars and starches are lost into the cooking water. When vegetables are roasted or baked in the oven, this loss of sugars and starches into water does not take place. For this reason, vegetables like boiled green beans will typically lose a small percent of both sugars and starches into the cooking water, whereas oven-roasted green beans will not. However, these changes in carbohydrate composition are once again relatively small and not usually a major factor in deciding about cooking method.

WHFoods Recommendations

When it comes to their carb content, vegetables can generally be enjoyed without problems in either cooked or raw form. Ratios of sugar to starch may change during cooking, as can amounts of available resistant starch and GI value. Among all of these factors, GI value may be the most important factor to consider for individuals who are following a diet that is focused on blood sugar control and insulin balance.

photo by: Tobyotter

CAN COFFEE AND TEA HELP PREVENT KIDNEY STONES?

Categories: Articles, Beverages, Food Education, Kidney Stones, Research Studies

coffee cup

http://www.prnewswire.co.uk/cgi/news/release?id=30199

 

coffee cupCAN COFFEE AND TEA HELP PREVENT KIDNEY STONES?

Kidney stones are common, painful and expensive to treat. It is estimated that about three people in every 100 in the UK will suffer from them.

And Koo Stark, former girlfriend of Prince Andrew and herself a sufferer, recently revealed in ‘Hello’ magazine that the condition will prevent her having the home birth she would have preferred for the baby she is carrying.

But according to a new report drinking plenty of coffee, tea, beer or wine could reduce the risk of getting a kidney stone while apple juice and grapefruit juice could, however, increase the risk.

The finding comes from a six-year survey of more than 45,000 American men, aged 40 to 75, by a team from the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA. The survey is part of a long-term study of cancer, heart and other diseases in which more than 50,000 health professionals are taking part.

Their drinking habits, with 21 different beverages from water to hard spirits, were compared with the development of 753 kidney stones among the men, none of whom had had one before.

After allowing for other effects, including other elements of the diet, the Harvard team put the decrease in risk at 10% for each 240ml (just over one and half cups) of coffee a day and 14% for tea. The same amount of beer (under half a pint) gave a reduced risk of 21% and of wine 39%. The risk increased by 35% for each 240ml of apple juice, and 37% for 240ml of grapefruit juice.

While the survey was on men over 40 who had not had a stone there was no reason to believe the findings would be any different for women, younger men or men who had already had kidney stones containing calcium oxalate.

The Harvard team suggest that caffeine interferes with the action of a urine-reducing hormone on the kidneys, while alcohol slows production of the hormone, resulting in more and weaker urine with less chance of crystals forming. More research is needed, they say.

Patients are usually advised to drink a lot to increase the volume of their urine, but this does not always work in preventing another stone. It would seem that what people drink could be as important as how much they drink.

Note to Editors:

Known medically as calculi, kidney stones may be formed due to an infection in the urinary tract or from an excess of salts in the bloodstream which crystallise in the urine. Stones which remain in the kidney may cause no discomfort but even a small stone on the move to the bladder can cause excruciating pain by tearing the lining of the urinary tract.

Distributed by PR Newswire on behalf of Coffee News Information Service


Contact details for all releases are only available to the media via PR Newswire for Journalists.


photo by: Moyan_Brenn

Chinese View of Nutrition discussed by Two Western Nutritionists

Categories: Articles, Asian, Eastern Nutrition, Food Education, Food Energetics

Chinese food has a bad reputation in the UK. The rice-heavy meals and fatty meat dishes are thought to lead straight to obesity and heart disease. But properly prepared, says Chinese food expert Lorraine Clissold, the very opposite is true: the Chinese way of eating is healthy and fulfilling, fights illness and prolongs life. She also insists, in her book Why the Chinese Don’t Count Calories, that a real Chinese diet won’t make you fat, and that the rising levels of obesity observable in China are in fact caused by sugary, overprocessed Western food. Here are some of her Chinese dietary secrets‚ and the verdict of two Western nutrition experts, Patrick Holford and Ian Marber.

1. Stop counting calories

The Chinese don’t have a word for “calories”. They view food as nourishment, not potential weight gain. A 1990 survey found that Chinese people consumed 30 per cent more calories than Americans, but were not necessarily more active. Clissold says their secret is avoiding the empty calories of sugary, nutrient-free foods.

Holford says: “The latest research into weight loss shows that calorie-controlled, low-fat diets are less effective than low glycemic load diets, which is exactly what a traditional Chinese diet is.”

Marber says: “There is one calorie in a Diet Coke, and 340 calories in an avocado. Which one is actually good for you? It’s a no-brainer. The avocado supplies you with monounsaturated fats and omega-6, which actually help increase metabolic rate.”

2. Think of vegetables as dishes

Rather than an uninspiring accompaniment to meat or fish, the Chinese treat vegetables as meals in their own right, rather than add-ons, as in the West.

Marber says: “I’m a great believer in combining protein and carbohydrate. There aren’t many complex carbohydrates in vegetables, but they should count as a dish. If the majority of your meal is vegetables, and you add some protein, you’ll always have a perfect meal.”

Holford says: “Vegetables should make up half of what’s on your plate in any given meal, so this fits perfectly with the Chinese diet.”

3. Fill up on staple foods

Without rice, which is low in fat and high in nutrients and fibre, claims Clissold, it is impossible to eat until you are full. Low-carb diets promise to burn fat, but Clissold says that replacing carbs with food that is higher in fat and lower in nutrients is not a long-term answer to weight loss.

Marber says: “I don’t agree. That Chinese person shovelling rice down is slightly pudgy because they eat too much rice. But from a financial point of view it’s very useful, because Atkins-style diets are very expensive.”

4. Eat until you are full

The Chinese eat until they are full, and then stop. Westerners often take a feast-and-famine approach to eating that is ridden with guilt, purging during the week, and binging over the weekend, or skipping lunch to make room for cake, The Chinese tend to eat three good meals every day.

Holford says: “Provided that a meal has a high intake of fibre-rich vegetables and a balance of protein and carbohydrate, which a typical Chinese meal would, then you should eat until you are full. But the combination of high sugar, refined carbs (the white stuff) and high fat allows for more food to be eaten in a short space of time before the body’s ‘appestat’ kicks in and tells you to stop.”

Marber says: “What does ‘full’ mean? I think so much of that message is lost in the conspicuous consumption of the Western world. But be careful: it takes a while for the brain to recognise CCK, the hormone released when you are full, so you’re actually full quite a lot earlier than you realise.”

5. Take liquid food

Soup, or a soup-based dish, is present at every Chinese meal, often in the form of a watery porridge, zhou. Western diets can be very dry, and nutritionists compensate by urging us to drink more water, which the Chinese would never do with a meal. Instead, they make a nourishing liquid food part of the meal. And it’s a great way of using up leftovers.

Holford says: “Thirst is often confused with hunger. Also, drinking does tend to fill you up. So soups help you control your appetite.”

Marber says: “I’m a great believer in soups before food. Miso soup, for instance, or anything fermented; these are probiotics, which help release nutrients from the food you are about to eat.”

6. Bring yin and yang into your kitchen

A good Chinese diet balances yin (wet and moist) and yang (dry and crisp) ingredients. Yin foods cool the body down, while yang foods (meat, spicy dishes, wine, coffee) heat it up. The sharing, multi-dish approach to eating in China means most meals contain yin and yang in equilibrium.

Marber says: “You should have complex carbs, a protein and a grain together for many different reasons, one of which is the experience of eating. The typical English bastardisation of Chinese food, chicken and cashew nuts, is a good example: you’ve got the softness of the chicken, the crunch of the nut and the satisfying rice.”

Holford says: “Most protein foods are seen as yang, carbohydrates as yin. The combination of these two helps stabilise blood sugar, which is the key to good energy and minimising weight gain.”

7. Raw power? not necessarily

Chinese people don’t eat raw salad. While raw food has a higher concentration of vitamins than cooked food, Clissold says the research ignores that lightly cooking food makes its nutrients easier for the body to take on. This way, it can conserve energy for other tasks. The stomach is unable to digest too much raw food; this can lead to bloating and weight gain.

Holford says: “The rawer the better. In almost all cases, raw food has more nutrients, though lightly cooking some vegetables can make those nutrients more bio-available.”

Marber says: “I don’t hold with this one. Eating a big salad with lots of different raw vegetables in it is very satisfying, and I can’t believe your average Brit is going to blanch salad.”

8. Use food to keep fit

Chinese medicine prescribes various foods as medical treatments: chillies to promote digestion and dispel cold; garlic to counteract toxins. The ultimate purpose is to ensure all the organs are working correctly to allow energy, or chi, to circulate smoothly around the body.

Holford says: “Two thousand years ago, Hippocrates said, ‘Let food be your medicine.’ But we in the West forgot. Peasant communities tend to have more respect for the cycle of food and how it supports life.”

9. Drink green tea

Green tea eliminates toxins, aids digestion and allays hunger. Scientists have found that it also fights free radicals, which cause cancer and heart disease.

Marber says: “I’m a great believer in green and herbal teas. Green tea is an important antioxidant, but it will only help you lose weight if you drink 40 cups a day. I’m also a great believer in a skinny latte once in a while, or every morning, in my case.”

Holford says: “Traditionally, when the Chinese want another cup of tea, they’ll keep the same leaves and add water to the pot. That’s like only using one teabag a day, which means much less caffeine.”

10. Take restorative exercise

Try regular, gentle exercise such as tai chi. A sweaty workout might shed fat, but it is stressful for your body. Energetic, aerobic workouts are yang (they heat us up) while breathing exercises are yin.

Holford says: “Exercise after a meal promotes an active metabolism and helps control appetite. Although no one has worked out how to measure chi, the vital energy that these exercises promote, it’s a real thing that can easily be experienced. Many trials now show benefits to energy levels and immunity from these chi-generating exercises.”

Marber says: “Tai chi gives you a sense of balance, calm and peacefulness. Sweating it out at the gym is the precise opposite, but I can’t help it; I’m vain, shallow and modern. I think we’ve got a really messed-up view of how the body should look, and that it’s how we look, rather than how we feel, that matters.”

Source: Sophie Morris, The Independent: Extra, 22 July 2008, page 8.

Western Nutrition info to help Prevent UTI

Categories: Articles, Urinary Bladder Damp Heat, Western Medicine

Nutrition and Supplements

Following these nutritional tips may help reduce symptoms:

* Drink a lot of fluids, such as herbal teas and water. Avoid sweetened fruit juices and other sweetened drinks.
* Cranberries and blueberries contain substances that inhibit the binding of bacteria to bladder tissue. Drinking unsweetened cranberry juice regularly helps lower the risk of UTIs.
* Try to eliminate potential food allergens, including dairy, wheat (gluten), corn, preservatives, and food additives. Your health care provider may want to test for food sensitivities.If you are susceptible to UTIs, drinking cranberry juice or taking cranberry pills may help prevent recurrence.
* Eat antioxidant foods, including fruits (such as blueberries, cherries, and tomatoes), and vegetables (such as squash and bell peppers).
* Eat more high fiber foods, including beans, oats, root vegetables (such as potatoes and yams), and psyllium seed.
* Avoid refined foods such as white breads, pastas, and especially sugar.
* Eat fewer red meats and more lean meats, cold water fish, tofu (soy, if no allergy is present) or beans for protein.
* Use healthy cooking oils, such as olive oil or vegetable oil.
* Reduce or eliminate trans fatty acids, found in commercially baked goods, such as cookies, crackers, cakes, French fries, onion rings, donuts, processed foods, and margarine.
* Avoid coffee and other stimulants, alcohol, and tobacco.
* Drink 6 – 8 glasses of filtered water daily.
* Exercise at least 30 minutes daily, 5 days a week.

You may address nutritional deficiencies with the following supplements:

* A multivitamin daily, containing the antioxidant vitamins A, C, E, the B-complex vitamins and trace minerals, such as magnesium, calcium, zinc, and selenium.
* Vitamin C, 500 – 1,000 mg 1 – 2 times daily, as an antioxidant and for immune support.
* Omega-3 fatty acids, such as fish oil, 1 – 2 capsules or 1 tablespoonful oil 1 – 2 times daily, to help decrease inflammation and promote general health. Cold water fish, such as salmon or halibut, are good sources. Fish oil supplements can increase the effects of certain blood thinning medications.
* IP-6 (Inositol hexophosphonate), 1 – 8 grams daily on an empty stomach, for kidney health. Check with your health care provider for proper dosing.
* L-glutamine, 500 – 1,000 mg 3 times daily, for support of gastrointestinal health and immunity.
* Probiotic supplement (containing Lactobacillus acidophilus), 5 – 10 billion CFUs (colony forming units) a day, for maintenance of gastrointestinal and immune health. There is strong scientific evidence to support the use of probiotics for urological conditions. Refrigerate probiotic supplements for best results.
* Grapefruit seed extract (Citrus paradisi), 100 mg capsule or 5 – 10 drops (in favorite beverage) 3 times daily, for antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activity.

http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/urinary-tract-000169.htm

Ayervedic ideas for Fertility

Categories: Articles, Food Culture, Food Energetics, Indian, Infertility

I want to recommend you begin to cook with butter and ghee for fertility especially for wood overacting type clients. They is considered very nourishing to add more “cushion” and earth material to their system. Highly concentrated and healthy, natural fats are good for you at this time. I can’t imagine would be come overly obese so this is fine for them unless you have short term concerns for cholesterol. If you have any questions let me know. Otherwise enjoy!

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-ghee.htm

I found this thread about fertility from an Indian medical perspective. Some nice ideas for you and the husband. If you don’t know the herbs just use the ones you can. If your husband ever wants a consult let me know also. It takes two to tango )

“Ojas and Shukra/Artava is the key to fertility (vajikarana) in Ayurveda. Eat ghee on rice and cook with it in general, drink warm milk with raw sugar or honey, blend it or cook it with Shatavari, and Vidhari (wild yam). Also you can soak
over night and peel in the morning ten almonds, add a pinch of cardamom, saffron, and a tsp of raw sugar and blend with hot milk. Practice Yoga Assanas especially ones that bend at the waist and abdomen, like yoga Mudra, Durga Pranam, and Cobra. Loosely fill a jar with dates (w/o pits) than fill it with warm ghee so that it takes up the rest of the air space. Mix in ½ tsp of nutmeg and cardamom, add a nice pinch of Saffron, let it sit for a week, than eat one ghee soaked date per day, it can be eaten with soaked & peeled almonds or warm milk, or alone, it’s a nice rejuvenative for any after sex food cravings. Cook with wild yam in soups.
For him: Eat plenty of Urud dhal, soak them and make them into idly or Dosa, Urud dhal roasted in ghee and than cooked with milk and raw sugar is great if you can make it palatable. Make the above Almond milk shake but add, ¼ teaspoon of each: Ashwaganda, Bala, Gokshura, Vidhari, Shatavri, Kapi Kachu, Shimula, Maca, Suma, American Ginseng, ( I call
this the Super Man formula) Its better to mix these herbs ahead of time and just add a tablespoon as needed. Eat plenty of sweet potatoes and pumpkin. Dates and figs are also good food for this. Massage the body with warm sesame oil , especially over abdomen a couple times per week, before a warm shower.

Indian Cooking; Nutrition Info

Categories: Articles, Asian, Cooking tips, Food Culture, Indian, Nutritional Information, Western Medicine

This is not how I normally like to look at food, through caloric and fat content counting, but it is useful info to look over to get an idea of what you are putting in your body. I eat mostly vegetarian (flexitarian really) and just a friend just moved to the Devon area. This is THE Indian and Pakistani area of Chicago and so I have been eating rich, delicious vegetarian Indian food just about every night. I hope to cook some tasty, nutritious meals in this style soon. Until there here are a few ideas and tips for those who want to explore this “other” Eastern Culture’s food. It is a deep well to explore. Good Indian is some of the most rich and delicious of meals, maybe because of Yin nourishing aspect and fat content. I don’t know about some of the claims below, but worth noting. Feel free to comment. ~ Enjoy

 

Mitch

_____________

Nutrition data (calories, carbohydrates, protein) of homemade Indian food are given. Also the ways to preserve nutrition in Indian cooking are discussed.

Many Indian are vegetarians and they eat vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and plant-based proteins. These foods contain essential micro-nutrients and vitamins that produce antioxidants which are good for heart, blood pressure and diabetes.

But Indians, in general, consume less amount of vegetables {says who?}. Also reheating of vegetarian dishes, a common practice among Indians, destroys the micro-nutrients. “Indians, therefore, face heart attacks five years earlier than people in the West,” according to Dr Deepak Natarajan of Apollo hospital, Delhi.

Diets rich in saturated fats and hypertension are the main reason for this.

Indian Cooking & Nutrition

http://www.fatfreekitchen.com/nutrition/indian-foods.html

By 2010, India will carry 60 percent of the world’s heart disease burden, nearly four times more than its share of the global population, according to a study released by Denis Xavier of St. John’s National Academy of Health Sciences in Bangalore in April 2008.

  • Calories in Indian foods and their nutrition depend on the way the foods are cooked.
  • An Indian dish may be very high in calories/energy (mostly from fat) if it is cooked by deep frying, or it may be low in calories or fat if it is stir fried or baked.
  • The rich creamy dishes containing foods covered with lot of spice colored liquid are often very high in fat (mostly saturated fat and trans-fat), while the tandoori dishes are low in fat.

    The research (Feb 2010) conducted by “Which” magazine of Britain found that a single meal of Indian curry in Britain has more fat than the recommendation for the entire day, an average takeaway contained 23.2gm of saturated fat, 3.2gm more than a woman should eat in a day.  Indian takeaway meals are known for their liberal use of ghee and oil, not only in curries but also breads. The researchers found that a naan contained more calories than a chicken tikka masala.

  • Indian often reheat the food, the reheating destroys the nutrients of the food.
  • Indian food is often overcooked, destroying its nutrition.
  • The North Indian dishes are very rich in taste and presentation as compared to South Indian food. The North Indian foods, especially Punjabi foods, are generally higher in calories and fat and lower in nutritional value, than South Indian foods because Punjabi cooking involves tarka or vaghar (frying of spices, onions, etc.) in pure ghee (high in
    saturated fat), butter, oil or trans fats or trans-fatty acids (hydrogenated oils and fats, dalda) that gives unique Indian taste and texture. Read more on trans fats in Indian foods.
  • The tandoori foods of North India are rich in nutrition and natural flavours, but often these are loaded with fats. A new research reported at a conference on “Fats and trans-fatty acids in Indian diet” at the Seventh Health Writers Workshop organised by Health Essayists and Authors League (HEAL) in 2007 found that the trans-fatty acids in French fries is 4.2% – 6.1%, it is 9.5% in bhatura, 7.8% in paratha and 7.6% each in puri and tikkis.

How to Preserve Nutrition in Indian Cooking?

The health benefits of the Indian food depend on the method of cooking.

  1. If a recipe calls for too much cream, yogurt, ghee or oil and crushed cashews, then the dish will be very rich in taste and texture, but with out any nutritional value. The north Indian food, Punjabi food and the foods available in restaurants are cooked (rather over-cooked) like this and they are higher in fat and lower in nutritional value. These foods are generally prepared with deep frying onions, ginger, and spices in lot of oil or ghee. Read more on Indian
    food nutrition and calories
    .
  2. Instead of deep frying, you can stir-fry or saute them in very little vegetable oil. The over-cooked foods lose their nutrition because, in the process, the vitamins and minerals are leached out. You should leave the cooking of a vegetable when it is still crisp.
  3. Never use trans-fat or vanaspati like dalda, rath, etcfor cooking, these are not healthy. Many restaurants and shops use trans-fats for cooking tikkis, bhaturas, parathas, puri (poori) and even sweets and vegetable curries
  4. Do not chop the vegetbles into too small pieces. The vegetable will lose its nutrients if it has more exposed surfaces to the atmosphere.
  5. Always chop the vegetables only when you cook them, do not chop and leave them for a long time.
  6. Do not wash the vegetables like spinach, zucchini, lauki, etc. after chopping to preserve their nutrients.
  7. When you stir-fry, do not overheat the oil.
  8. If you make pakoras, keep the besan batter thick. Deep frying of thin batter pakoras absorb too much oil during frying.
  9. Do not add ghee or oil for making the dough of poori, otherwise the pooris will absorb too much oil during frying.

However, it is possible to have traditional Indian cooking recipes that produce tasty dishes with very less fat and keeping the natural nutrition values and low calories.

Kombucha Tea… is it the miracle home remedy drink?

Categories: Articles

We all are searching for more energy and rejuvenation. The kombucha tea is supposed to remedy many ailments. If this is true, why aren’t we all drinking this potent but delicious beverage that improves health?

Our neighboring health food store sells kombucha, bottled and flavored and I’ve seen fellow students drinking it but was not sure what it was. KOMBUCHA (pronounced kom-Boo-cha) is a handmade Chinese mushroom tea that is delicately cultured for 30 days. The beverage contains microorganisms of lactic acid and related symbioses of bacteria and yeast, the tea fungus. A Kombucha mushroom is not a real mushroom; people only call it a mushroom. It is something like lichen and when grown it looks like a pancake floating on the surface of the tea that it is brewed in. The tea made from it does not have the flavor of mushrooms. The taste when mixed with green, orange or black tea leaves it is more like a wine/ apple-cider drink. The “mushroom” is fast growing and turns the tea in which it grows into radical proteins, beneficial acids, and vitamins that work to quickly clean and detoxify your blood. It has active enzymes, probiotics, amino acids, antioxidants and polyphenols. Glucuronic acid (debated}, or its precursors are also present in Kombucha Tea, this acid is a metabolite that is produced by a healthy liver and aids in the detoxification of the body. By drinking Kombucha Tea daily you may help prevent your body tissues from absorbing all the toxins and poisons found in our environment that may cause illness. The tea-mushroom is a real tiny biochemical factory “a wonder mushroom†that has healing power for many diseases.

Some of the diseases that this tea helps is headaches, constipation, arteriosclerosis, pain in the limbs, gout, rheumatism, arthritis, intestinal & digestive disturbances and enhances or stimulates the metabolism, helps with high blood pressure, fight against cancer and diabetes, just to name a few.

In summary one can say that Kombucha mushroom tea taken for well being has proven itself as an excellent prophylactic against many general body dysfunctions. If this tea has so many helpful benefits & few side-effects why not have a glass or two a day. So look no more for the fountain of youth elixir, the wonder mushroom successfully counters aging problems therefore contributing to life extension. It’s cool & refreshing & tastes good-go for it-cheers to your longevity!”

Judge for yourself & grow your own fungus @:

http://www.acupuncture.com

http://www.kombuchaamerica.com/index.shtml

http://www.seedsofhealth.co.uk/fermenting/kombucha_howto.shtml